The Magazine

Back to the 1880s

There is no new conservative era; the good news is things are bad for Democrats, too

Dec 4, 2000, Vol. 6, No. 12 • By DAVID FRUM
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More probably, though, the something that will jolt the country out of its eight-year stalemate remains as yet unseen: some new crisis, some new leader, some new generational experience. And if the twenty years of deadlock that followed Reconstruction are any guide, it may not arrive anytime soon.

1876


 


 

Rutherford B. Hayes


(R)


* 47.95 percent

Samuel Tilden


(D)


50.97 percent

1880


 


 

James A. Garfield


(R)


* 48.27 percent

Winfield Hancock


(D)


48.25 percent

1884


 


 

Grover Cleveland


(D)


* 48.50 percent

James G. Blaine


(R)


48.25 percent

1888


 


 

Benjamin Harrison


(R)


* 47.82 percent

Grover Cleveland


(D)


48.62 percent

1892


 


 

Grover Cleveland


(D)


* 46.05 percent

Benjamin Harrison


(R)


42.96 percent



* winner



 

The 1990s had three:

1992


 


 

Bill Clinton


(D)


* 43.01 percent

George Bush


(R)


37.45 percent

H. Ross Perot


(I)


18.91 percent

1996


 


 

Bill Clinton


(D)


* 49.24 percent

Bob Dole


(R)


40.71 percent

H. Ross Perot


(I)


8.40 percent

2000


 


 

Al Gore


(D)


49.00 percent

George W. Bush


(R)


48.00 percent



* winner




David Frum, a contributing editor to THE WEEKLY STANDARD, is the author of a history of the 1970s, How We Got Here.