The Magazine

Hillary Who?

Is there a Clinton in the 2008 race?

Jul 30, 2007, Vol. 12, No. 43 • By TOD LINDBERG
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A miniflap recently broke out over a Politico item about a July 9 memo to "Interested Parties" from Mark Penn, Hillary Clinton's chief strategist. Penn's memo was definitely designed to foster an impression of growing Clinton strength. Politico's Ben Smith went a step farther in his characterization of the memo, however, saying it implied a Clinton victory was "inevitable." Penn and Co. disavowed that characterization, and Smith subsequently took out the quotation marks he'd put around "inevitable" in his original post. Thus did the Clinton campaign find itself in the enviable position of having established its humility while pressing the immodest line that the candidate's "electoral strength has grown in the last quarter and she is better positioned today than ever before to become the next President of the United States."

Maybe she is. But Penn is subtle, and there were at least two exercises in positioning going on in his memo. The overt one was about the candidate's strength. The second, almost subliminal, was about--well, let's take an exhaustive look at the text's references to the candidate:

" . . . a good time to see where Hillary stands and why . . . Hillary's electoral strength has grown . . . Hillary has the strength and experience . . . Hillary's message: that her strength and experience . . . Hillary's support in the last few months has strengthened . . . as the candidates' name ID's have increased, so has Hillary's lead . . . just how ready Hillary is . . . each debate provides Hillary with another opportunity . . . Hillary's lead in the Democratic primary nearly doubled . . . Hillary's favorability has risen . . . Hillary leads top Republican Rudy Giuliani . . . Hillary leads . . . Hillary is tied or ahead . . . "

We'll stop there. I count a total of 36 references to "Hillary" or its possessive form in a memo of about 1,800 words. When Penn cues up the poll results against her Democratic rivals or the frontrunning Republicans, they are "Obama" and "Edwards" and "Giuliani"; she is "HRC."

Number of times the name "Clinton" appears in the memo: zero.

Now, it is not as if the use of "Hillary" began with this Penn memo. The campaign has often used the candidate's first name as a second reference to "Hillary Clinton" (for example, unsigned "campaign memos" of April 27 and June 22). And it has sometimes even started with "Hillary" and picked up with "Hillary Clinton" (as does an earlier Penn memo from June 11). Sometimes the purpose of deploying the candidate's full name seems to have been to pack some rhetorical punch. The April 27 memo concludes, apparently in an effort to be resounding: "Americans are looking for a President who will start from strength and be ready to lead from day one. And that person is Hillary Clinton."

What's new about the July 9 Penn memo is that the "Clinton" references have disappeared completely. I am almost tempted to say "once and for all"--except that if I were on the Clinton campaign and somebody wrote an article in THE WEEKLY STANDARD making such a claim, I'd slip a "Clinton" into the next one just to establish nyah-nyah privileges.

The drift is clear. The brand is "Hillary." The brand is not "Clinton." The candidate's official website is hillaryclinton.com. That domain name must have been registered long ago, and unfortunately for the candidate's current preferences, hillary.com is the website of a software company.

But if you Google "Hillary" with the "I'm Feeling Lucky" button, what you get is the official campaign website, and the campaign's logo popping up in the upper left corner of your screen says, "Hillary for President." Click on the button there labeled "Hillary" and you get the candidate biography, where you will encounter the name "Clinton" exactly once. It's about how Hillary spurned offers from law firms in order to follow "her heart and a man named Bill Clinton to Arkansas." Thereafter, he's "Bill" or "her husband," though in truth he doesn't much figure into the Hillary story. But she is "Hillary" and only "Hillary" throughout.

Consistency, they've got. If you follow the link to HillaryStore.com, the merchandise for sale there refers to the candidate only as Hillary (with an occasional "H," à la George Bush's "W" bumper sticker). The "Super Size House Party" pack ($185, plus $2 for oversized shipping) contains 1 baseball cap, 1 travel mug, 5 lapel pins, 25 campaign bumper stickers, 25 campaign buttons, 10 campaign rally signs, 10 yard signs with wires, and 1 pack of 20 balloons, each of which says "Hillary," none of which mentions "Clinton," except when providing the website address.