The Blog

Alleged Jihadist Arrested for Plot Aimed at George W. Bush, Others

3:32 PM, Feb 24, 2011 • By DANIEL HALPER
Widget tooltip
Single Page Print Larger Text Smaller Text Alerts

The New York Times reports on a Saudi Arabian man in Texas who "has been arrested by federal agents, who charged him with planning to build bombs for terror attacks inside the United States, the Justice Department announced on Thursday." The alleged plotter is named Khalid Ali-M Aldawsari. He studies business at South Plains College in Lubbock, Texas.

But what business was Aldawsari actually involved in? "According to an affidavit filed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the man, Khalid Ali-M Aldawsari, indicated in online research and in a journal that he was considering attacking the Dallas home of former President George W. Bush as well as hydroelectric dams, nuclear power plants, night clubs, and soldiers who were formerly stationed at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq," according to the Times.

Aldawsari was clearly well beyond the conceptual stages of his plans:

 A subsequent investigation found that he had already obtained large supplies of the other two chemicals needed for the explosive compound — trinitrophenol or TNP — in December, court documents said.

“Aldawsari purchased ingredients to construct an explosive device and was actively researching potential targets in the United States,” said David Kris, the assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s national security division. “Thanks to the efforts of many agents, analysts and prosecutors, this plot was thwarted before it could advance further.”

There was no indication on Thursday that investigators had found links between Mr. Aldawsari and Al Qaeda or some other foreign militant group. According to the affidavit, he wrote in his journal that he wanted to found a new terrorist group modeled after Al Qaeda, which he would lead, and he indicated that he had been methodically planning for years to commit a terror attack.         

Recent Blog Posts

The Weekly Standard Archives

Browse 15 Years of the Weekly Standard

Old covers