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Back to Vacation: Obama Takes Midnight Flight to Hawaii

Round-trip cost of president's return trip: $3.6 million.

7:04 AM, Jan 2, 2013 • By DANIEL HALPER
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After Congress agreed temporarily to avert the "fiscal cliff" last night, President Barack Obama hailed the deal in brief remarks delivered from the White House, and then headed to Air Force One to take a midnight flight to Hawaii. Obama had left his family days earlier to return to Washington to deal with the "fiscal cliff."

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Obama "ended a seven-minute statement in the Press Briefing Room starting at about 11:27 p.m.," according to the pool report. "Dressed only in a blue suit, he walked across the South Lawn to board Marine One at 11:40 p.m."

The pool report adds, "Marine One touched down at Andrews Air Force Base at 11:54 p.m. POTUS, still in a dark gray suit and light blue tie, walked quickly to Air Force One and dashed up the stairs. Valerie Jarrett, Jay Carney and Alyssa Mastromonaco also are on board tonight. At 12:01 a.m., Air Force One is rolling."

But the American tax payer paid a price for Obama's return.

The cost of flying Air Force One from Andrews Air Force Base to Hawaii, MSNBC reports this morning is, $1.8 million. That means the total round-trip cost of President Obama’s return trip to Washington from his Hawaii vacation was at least $3.6 million.

"The President and First Family do not have any scheduled public events during their time in Hawai’i," according to the White House.

The president is expected to land in Honolulu at 5:15 a.m. local time. He has yet to sign the bill, which has now passed the Senate and House, to avert temporarily the "fiscal cliff."

Vice President Joe Biden will also be out of town today.

"The Vice President will be in Wilmington, Delaware. There are no public events scheduled," the White House's schedule for Biden reads.

There's no word on when Obama and Biden will return to Washington.

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