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Barack "Dude" Obama on Jon Stewart's Daily Show

11:18 AM, Oct 28, 2010 • By DANIEL HALPER
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On October 30, 2008 -- just days before the 2008 presidential election -- Bill Kristol restored sanity on Jon Stewart's Daily Show:

Kristol: I don't think [Obama would] be a very radical president. I think in fact he'll disappoint a lot of people on the left because he'll be a conventionally liberal president. And if you're a liberal you should be for Obama, and if you're a conservative you should be for McCain. It's not a psycho-drama. It's just an election, you know? 

Stewart: No.

Boy, much has changed! Here's Dana Milbank's take on Obama's appearance on Stewart's show last night:

On Comedy Central, the joke was on President Obama Wednesday night.

The president had come, on the eve of what will almost certainly be the loss of his governing majority, to plead his case before Jon Stewart, gatekeeper of the disillusioned left. But instead of displaying the sizzle that won him an army of youthful supporters two years ago, Obama had a Brownie moment.

The Daily Show host was giving Obama a tough time about hiring the conventional and Clintonian Larry Summers as his top economic advisor.

"In fairness," the president replied defensively, "Larry Summers did a heckuva job."

"You don't want to use that phrase, dude," Stewart recommended with a laugh.

Dude. The indignity of a comedy show host calling the commander in chief "dude" pretty well captured the moment for Obama. He was making this first-ever appearance by a president on the Daily Show as part of a long-shot effort to rekindle the spirit of '08. In the Daily Show, Obama had a friendly host and an even friendlier crowd....

Stewart, who struggled to suppress a laugh as Obama defended Summers, turned out to be an able inquisitor on behalf of aggrieved liberals. He spoke for the millions who had been led to believe that Obama was some sort of a messianic figure. Obama has only himself to blame for their letdown. By raising expectations impossibly high, playing the transformational figure to Hillary Clinton's status-quo drone, he gave his followers an unrealistic hope.

"You're coming from a place, you ran on a very high rhetoric: 'hope' and 'change.' And the Democrats this year seem to be running on 'Please, baby, one more chance.'" Stewart observed. "Are you disappointed in how it's gone?"

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