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Chris Christie's Ronald Reagan Library Speech

9:01 PM, Sep 27, 2011 • By DANIEL HALPER
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We should care because we believe, as President Reagan did, that democracy is the best protector of human dignity and freedom.  And we know this because history shows that mature democracies are less likely to resort to force against their own people or their neighbors. 

We should care because we believe in free and open trade, as exports are the best creators of high-paying jobs here and imports are a means to increase consumer choice and keep prices down.

Around the world– in the Middle East, in Asia, in Africa and Latin America—people are debating their own political and economic futures–right now. 

We have a stake in the outcome of their debates.  For example, a Middle East that is largely democratic and at peace will be a Middle East that accepts Israel, rejects terrorism, and is a dependable source of energy. 

There is no better way to reinforce the likelihood that others in the world will opt for more open societies and economies than to demonstrate that our own system is working. 

A lot is being said in this election season about American exceptionalism.   Implicit in such statements is that we are different and, yes, better, in the sense that our democracy, our economy and our people have delivered.  But for American exceptionalism to truly deliver hope and a sterling example to the rest of the world, it must be demonstrated, not just asserted.  If it is demonstrated, it will be seen and appreciated and ultimately emulated by others.  They will then be more likely to follow our example and our lead.

At one time in our history, our greatness was a reflection of our country’s innovation, our determination, our ingenuity and the strength of our democratic institutions.  When there was a crisis in the world, America found a way to come together to help our allies and fight our enemies.  When there was a crisis at home, we put aside parochialism and put the greater public interest first.  And in our system, we did it through strong presidential leadership.  We did it through Reagan-like leadership.

Unfortunately, through our own domestic political conduct of late, we have failed to live up to our own tradition of exceptionalism.  Today, our role and ability to affect change has been diminished because of our own problems and our inability to effectively deal with them. 

To understand this clearly, one need only look at comments from the recent meeting of the European finance ministers in Poland.  Here is what the Finance Minister of Austria had to say:

“I found it peculiar that, even though the Americans have significantly worse fundamental data than the euro zone, that they tell us what we should do.  I had expected that, when [Secretary Geithner] tells us how he sees the world, that he would listen to what we have to say.”

You see, without strong leadership at home—without our domestic house in order—we are taking ourselves out of the equation.  Over and over, we are allowing the rest of the world to set the tone without American influence.

I understand full well that succeeding at home, setting an example, is not enough.  The United States must be prepared to act.  We must be prepared to lead.  This takes resources—resources for defense, for intelligence, for homeland security, for diplomacy.  The United States will only be able to sustain a leadership position around the world if the resources are there—but the necessary resources will only be there if the foundations of the American economy are healthy.  So our economic health is a national security issue as well.    

Without the authority that comes from that exceptionalism—earned American exceptionalism—we cannot do good for other countries, we cannot continue to be a beacon of hope for the world to aspire to for their future generations. 

If Ronald Reagan faced today’s challenges we know what he would do.  He would face our domestic problems directly, with leadership and without political calculation. 

We would take an honest and tough approach to solving our long-term debt and deficit problem through reforming our entitlement programs and our tax code.

We would confront our unemployment crisis by giving certainty to business about our tax and regulatory future.

We would unleash American entrepreneurship through long-term tax reform, not short-term tax gimmickry.

And we would reform our K-12 education system by applying free market reform principles to education—rewarding outstanding teachers; demanding accountability from everyone in the system; increasing competition through choice and charters; and making the American free public education system once again the envy of the world. 

The guiding principle should be simple and powerful—the educational interests of children must always be put ahead of the comfort of the status quo for adults.

The United States must also become more discriminating in what we try to accomplish abroad. We certainly cannot force others to adopt our principles through coercion.  Local realities count; we cannot have forced makeovers of other societies in our image.  We need to limit ourselves overseas to what is in our national interest so that we can rebuild the foundations of American power here at home – foundations that need to be rebuilt in part so that we can sustain a leadership role in the world for decades to come. 

The argument for getting our own house in order is not an argument for turning our back on the world. 

We cannot and should not do that.  First of all, our economy is dependent on what we export and import.  And as we learned the hard way a decade ago, we as a country and a people are vulnerable to terrorists armed with box cutters, bombs, and viruses, be they computer generated or man-made.  We need to remain vigilant, and be prepared to act with our friends and allies, to discourage, deter or defend against traditional aggression; to stop the spread of nuclear materials and weapons and the means to deliver them; and to continue to deprive terrorists of the ways, means and opportunity to succeed.

I realize that what I am calling for requires a lot of our elected officials and a lot of our people.  I plead guilty.  But I also plead guilty to optimism. 

Like Ronald Reagan, I believe in what this country and its citizens can accomplish if they understand what is being asked of them and how we all will benefit if they meet the challenge. 

There is no doubt in my mind that we, as a country and as a people, are up for the challenge.  Our democracy is strong; our economy is the world’s largest.  Innovation and risk-taking is in our collective DNA.  There is no better place for investment.  Above all, we have a demonstrated record as a people and a nation of rising up to meet challenges. 

Today, the biggest challenge we must meet is the one we present to ourselves.  To not become a nation that places entitlement ahead of accomplishment.  To not become a country that places comfortable lies ahead of difficult truths.  To not become a people that thinks so little of ourselves that we demand no sacrifice from each other.  We are a better people than that; and we must demand a better nation than that.

The America I speak of is the America Ronald Reagan challenged us to be every day.  Frankly, it is the America his leadership helped us to be.  Through our conduct, our deeds, our demonstrated principles and our sacrifice for each other and for the greater good of the nation, we became a country emulated throughout the world.  Not just because of what we said, but because of what we did both at home and abroad.

If we are to reach real American exceptionalism, American exceptionalism that can set an example for freedom around the world, we must lead with purpose and unity.

In 2004, Illinois State Senator Barack Obama gave us a window into his vision for American leadership.  He said, “Now even as we speak, there are those who are preparing to divide us — the spin masters, the negative ad peddlers who embrace the politics of ‘anything goes.’ Well, I say to them tonight, there is not a liberal America and a conservative America — there is the United States of America. There is not a Black America and a White America and Latino America and Asian America — there’s the United States of America.”

Now, seven years later, President Obama prepares to divide our nation to achieve re-election.  This is not a leadership style, this is a re-election strategy.  Telling those who are scared and struggling that the only way their lives can get better is to diminish the success of others.  Trying to cynically convince those who are suffering that the American economic pie is no longer a growing one that can provide more prosperity for all who work hard.  Insisting that we must tax and take and demonize those who have already achieved the American Dream.  That may turn out to be a good re-election strategy for President Obama, but is a demoralizing message for America.  What happened to State Senator Obama?  When did he decide to become one of the “dividers” he spoke of so eloquently in 2004?  There is, of course, a different choice. 

That choice is the way Ronald Reagan led America in the 1980’s.  That approach to leadership is best embodied in the words he spoke to the nation during his farewell address in 1989.  He made clear he was not there just marking time.  That he was there to make a difference.  Then he spoke of the city on the hill and how he had made it stronger.  He said, “I’ve spoken of the shining city all my political life, but I don’t know if I ever quite communicated what I saw when I said it. But in my mind it was a tall proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, wind-swept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace, a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity, and if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That’s how I saw it and see it still.”

That is American exceptionalism.  Not a punch line in a political speech, but a vision followed by a set of principled actions that made us the envy of the world.  Not a re-election strategy, but an American revitalization strategy. 

We will be that again, but not until we demand that our leaders stand tall by telling the truth, confronting our shortcomings, celebrating our successes and, once again leading the world because of what we have been able to actually accomplish. 

Only when we do that will we finally ensure that our children and grandchildren will live in a second American century.  We owe them, as well as ourselves and those who came before us, nothing less.

Thank you again for inviting me—God Bless you and God Bless the United States of America.

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