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Fossil Fuel Production on Federal Lands at a Nine-Year Low

What can the president do about gas prices? Stop shutting down energy production on federal land.

4:08 PM, Mar 15, 2012 • By MARK HEMINGWAY
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The Energy Information Administration—a federal agency—just released a report titled, "Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 Through FY 2011." The Institute for Energy Research summarizes the report's major findings:

-Fossil fuel (coal, oil, and natural gas) production on Federal and Indian lands is the lowest in the 9 years EIA reports data and is 6 percent less than in fiscal year 2010.

-Crude oil and lease condensate production on Federal and Indian lands is 13 percent lower than in fiscal year 2010.

-Natural gas production on Federal and Indian lands is the lowest in the 9 years that EIA reports data and is 10 percent lower than in fiscal year 2010.

-Natural gas plant liquids production on Federal and Indian lands is 3 percent lower than in fiscal year 2010.

-Coal production on Federal and Indian lands is the lowest in the 9 years of data that EIA reported and is 2 percent lower than in fiscal year 2010.

Recently on THE WEEKLY STANDARD blog, Mario Loyola explained in detail the Obama administration's misguided energy policy:

The federal government controls about a third of the nation’s oil production, through federal onshore leases (mostly in the West, where it owns half the land) and leases to drill in outer continental shelf (OCS) starting 10 miles off the coast. The rest of America’s oil production is on state-owned land (including coastal areas) and on private lands subject to state regulation.

As a direct result of the president’s severe constriction of oil production under federal leases, domestic U.S. oil production will be nearly one million barrels per day lower this year than it would have been otherwise.

Read the whole thing here.

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