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Handel on Perdue: 'Bless His Heart'

10:55 AM, Apr 10, 2014 • By MICHAEL WARREN
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In a new radio ad, Republican Senate candidate Karen Handel of Georgia hits back at her primary opponent David Perdue for his recently released comments about her lack of a college education. Perdue also touted his international business experience. The minute-long Handel ad replays Perdue's comments.

"When I heard David's comments, I thought, bless his heart," Handel says in a voiceover. "He's been overseas too long and lost touch with our values. Hard work and making the most of life: that's what makes Georgians great." Listen to the ad below:

Handel, who left a "troubled home" at age 17, cites her experience as the state's first elected Republican secretary of state, where she says she implemented photo identification requirements for voting and reduced her budget. "And I did all of this as a high school graduate," she adds in the spot.

"I approve this message because we need less elitism in Washington and more Georgia common sense," Handel concludes.

Perdue has led the five-way GOP primary for the Senate seat held by retiring Republican Saxby Chambliss, while Handel has struggled in a tied third place with a small campaign budget. But in recent weeks, Handel's fundraising numbers have ticked up following an endorsement and public appearance from Sarah Palin.

Joining Perdue and Handel in the GOP primary is Jack Kingston, the Savannah-based congressman who on Thursday reported a hefty $1.1 million fundraising haul for the first quarter of 2014. Kingston has polled around second place, while his fellow House colleagues Paul Broun and Phil Gingrey have been statistically tied with Handel in third place.

The winner of the May 20 primary will likely face the presumptive Democratic nominee, Michelle Nunn. Nunn is the daughter of former senator Sam Nunn and in one poll was shown to be leading all of her potential Republican challengers.

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