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Obama: 'We’ve Come a Long Way Since I First Took Office. As a Country, We’re Older and We’re Wiser.'

1:11 PM, Jul 24, 2013 • By DANIEL HALPER
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Add it all up, and over the past 40 months, our businesses have created 7.2 million new jobs.  This year, we are off to our strongest private-sector job growth since 1999.  And because we bet on this country, foreign companies are, too.  Right now, more of Honda’s cars are made in America than anywhere else.  Airbus will build new planes in Alabama.  Companies like Ford are replacing outsourcing with insourcing and bringing more jobs home.  We sell more products made in America to the rest of the world than ever before.  We now produce more natural gas than any country on Earth.  We’re about to produce more of our own oil than we buy from abroad for the first time in nearly 20 years.  The cost of health care is growing at its slowest rate in 50 years.  And our deficits are falling at the fastest rate in 60 years.

 

Thanks to the grit and resilience of the American people, we’ve cleared away the rubble from the financial crisis and begun to lay a new foundation for stronger, more durable economic growth.  In our personal lives, we tightened our belts, shed debt, and refocused on the things that really matter.  As a country, we’ve recovered faster and gone further than most other advanced nations in the world.  With new American revolutions in energy, technology, manufacturing, and health care, we are actually poised to reverse the forces that have battered the middle class for so long, and rebuild an economy where everyone who works hard can get ahead.

 

But I’m here today to tell you what you already know – we’re not there yet.  Even though our businesses are creating new jobs and have broken record profits, nearly all the income gains of the past ten years have continued to flow to the top 1%.  The average CEO has gotten a raise of nearly 40% since 2009, but the average American earns less than he or she did in 1999.  And companies continue to hold back on hiring those who have been out of work for some time. 

 

Today, more students are earning their degree, but soaring costs saddle them with unsustainable debt.  Health care costs are slowing, but many working families haven’t seen the savings yet.  And while the stock market rebound has helped families get back much of what they lost in their 401ks, millions of Americans still have no idea how they’ll ever be able to retire.  In many ways, the trends that I spoke of here in 2005 – of a winner-take-all economy where a few do better and better, while everybody else just treads water – have been made worse by the recession.

 

This growing inequality isn’t just morally wrong; it’s bad economics.  When middle-class families have less to spend, businesses have fewer customers. When wealth concentrates at the very top, it can inflate unstable bubbles that threaten the economy.  When the rungs on the ladder of opportunity grow farther apart, it undermines the very essence of this country.

 

That’s why reversing these trends must be Washington’s highest priority.  It’s certainly my highest priority.  Unfortunately, over the past couple of years in particular, Washington hasn’t just ignored the problem; too often, it’s made things worse.

 

We’ve seen a sizable group of Republican lawmakers suggest they wouldn’t vote to pay the very bills that Congress rang up – a fiasco that harmed a fragile recovery in 2011, and one we can’t afford to repeat.  Then, rather than reduce our deficits with a scalpel – by cutting programs we don’t need, fixing ones we do, and making government more efficient – this same group has insisted on leaving in place a meat cleaver called the sequester that has cost jobs, harmed growth, hurt our military, and gutted investments in American education and scientific and medical research that we need to make this country a magnet for good jobs.

 

Over the last six months, this gridlock has gotten worse.  A growing number of Republican Senators are trying to get things done, like an immigration bill that economists say will boost our economy by more than a trillion dollars.  But a faction of Republicans in the House won’t even give that bill a vote, and gutted a farm bill that America’s farmers and most vulnerable children depend on. 

 

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