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Obamacare Is Even More Unpopular Now than in 2010

1:05 PM, Oct 29, 2012 • By JEFFREY H. ANDERSON
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One week before the election that will likely determine Obamacare’s fate, Americans support its repeal by an even wider margin than they did in the immediate aftermath of its highly unpopular passage. 

According to newly released polling from Rasmussen Reports, by a margin of 15 percentage points (54 to 39 percent), likely voters now support the repeal of President Obama’s centerpiece legislation.  In the first three polls taken in the wake of the House’s passage of Obamacare (on March 21, 2010), Rasmussen showed that likely voters then favored repeal by margins of 13 points (55 to 42 percent), 12 points (54 to 42 percent), and 12 points (54 to 42 percent).  Cementing Obamacare would be the principal focus of Obama’s second term.

The repeal of Obamacare is now supported by men (by 24 points), women (by 7 points), voters between the ages of 40 and 64 (by 22 points), seniors (by 32 points — and better than 2-to-1), Republicans (by 75 points — and better than 7-to-1), independents (by 9 points), those who make less than $20,000 annually (by 15 points), those who make between $20,000 and $40,000 (by 18 points), those who make between $40,000 and $60,000 (by 12 points), those who make between $60,000 and $75,000 (by 35 points — and better than 2-to-1), those who make between $75,000 and $100,000 (by 12 points), those who make $100,000 or more (by 3 points), those who work for private companies (by 6 points), those who are entrepreneurs (by 28 points), those who are retired (by 30 points), those who didn’t graduate from high school (by 49 points — and better than 3-to-1), those who graduated from high school but haven’t attended college (by 51 points — and better than 2-to-1), those who went to college but haven’t graduated (by 29 points), and those who graduated from college but haven’t attended graduate school (by 8 points). 

The repeal of Obamacare is opposed by voters under the age of 40 (by 4 points), Democrats (by 40 points — and better than 2-to-1), government employees (by 3 points), and those who have attended graduate school (by 10 points) — in other words, by Obama’s core constituency.

The more often Mitt Romney mentions Obamacare in these closing days (on the stump and especially in TV ads), the more likely he is to become the next president of the United States.

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