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Romney's 'Prebuttal' of Obama's State of the Union Address

1:54 PM, Jan 24, 2012 • By JOHN MCCORMACK
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Tampa, Fla.
Though he's dropped behind Newt Gingrich in Florida polls, Mitt Romney sought to project the confident air of a frontrunner Tuesday, as he delivered a speech that ignored his GOP rival and focused solely on President Obama's failed policies and the economy. Speaking to a small crowd of supporters and TV cameras at a drywall factory that had shuttered its doors, Romney said that "in 2008, this plant closed because of the economic downturn.  In a normal recovery under strong leadership, it could now be full of workers."

Mitt Romney

Romney's typical stump speech is heavy on feel-good patriotic talk about how much he loves the song "America the Beautiful," but today's remarks were focused more sharply on Obama. "This president’s agenda made these troubled times last longer.  He and his allies made it harder for the economy to recover," Romney said. "Instead of solving the housing crisis and getting Americans back to work, President Obama has been building a European-style welfare state.  He has pushed for a second stimulus and deep cuts to our national defense. He’s asking the American people for another trillion dollars – and another term in office."

Romney said that at his State of the Union address, Obama "will give a nice speech with a lot of memorable phrases.  But he won’t give you the hard numbers. Like 9.9 – that’s the unemployment rate in this state. Or 25 percent – that’s the percentage of foreclosed homes in America that are right here in Florida. Or $15 trillion – that’s the size of our national debt." 

He continued:

Instead, tonight, the President will do what he does best. He will give a nice speech with a lot of memorable phrases. But he won’t give you the hard numbers. Like 9.9 – that’s the unemployment rate in this state. Or 25 percent – that’s the percentage of foreclosed homes in America that are right here in Florida. Or $15 trillion – that’s the size of our national debt.

Instead, tonight, President Obama will make the opening argument in his campaign against a “Do Nothing Congress.” But, we shouldn’t forget that for two years, this President had a Congress that could do everything he wanted.

With huge Democratic majorities in the House and Senate, President Obama was free to pursue any policy he pleased.

Did he fix the economy?

Did he tackle the housing crisis?

Did he get Americans back to work?

No.

He spent $787 billion on a stimulus bill and put us on track to borrow and spend $5 trillion in just his first term.

He forced through Obamacare – a trillion-dollar entitlement we don’t want and can’t afford.

He took over auto companies and student loans.

He stacked the National Labor Relations Board with union yes-men who, in turn, did favors for his campaign contributors and favorite friends.

When we needed stability and solvency, he gave us Solyndra.

When we needed a climate for private investment, he gave us Cash for Clunkers.

When we needed more domestic energy to keep prices low and create jobs, he imposed bans on oil drilling and turned his EPA regulators loose to slow our development of natural gas.

He’s spearheaded one of the largest expansions of government in American history. And he’s paying for it with money borrowed from China.

Three years ago, we measured Candidate Obama by his hopeful promises and slogans.

Today, President Obama has amassed an actual record of debt, decline, and disappointment.

This President’s agenda made these troubled times last longer. He and his allies made it harder for the economy to recover.

Instead of solving the housing crisis and getting Americans back to work, President Obama has been building a European-style welfare state. He has pushed for a second stimulus and deep cuts to our national defense. He’s asking the American people for another trillion dollars – and another term in office.

He keeps telling people, “We can’t wait.” To which I say, “Yes, we can.”

As he came to a close, Romney asked, "Do we want a president who keep telling us why he’s right and why we’re wrong? Or do we want the sense of excitement that comes with a new beginning?"


Of course, a 'sense of excitement' is something a lot of Republican voters do not feel about a potential President Romney. That's why, after spending the morning attacking Obama, the former Massachusetts governor will likely spend the afternoon trying to knock down Newt Gingrich at an event on housing policy near Ft. Myers.

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