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Seven Ways in Which the Latest Obamacare Decree Is Wrong

6:52 PM, Jan 20, 2012 • By JEFFREY H. ANDERSON
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As John McCormack writes, the Obama administration’s latest health-care decree states that, under Obamacare, religiously affiliated organizations (hospitals, schools, charities, and the like) will be required to provide free birth control and morning-after pills to their employees, including free coverage of the abortion pill ella.  Such overt politicizing of medicine is wrong on at least seven levels: 

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Elizabeth Cromwell

1. Insurers shouldn’t be mandated by law to have all of their new health plans cover birth-control pills, thereby denying Americans the freedom to select health plans of their own choosing, whether or not those plans cover such pills.

2. Even if it were justifiable to mandate that insurers only offer plans that cover birth-control pills, such mandates shouldn’t require insurers to provide such pills for free, thereby making everyone else pick up the tab.

3. Even if it were justifiable to mandate that insurers only offer plans that provide free birth control pills, such plans shouldn’t also be required to cover abortion drugs.

4. Even if were justifiable to mandate that insurers only offer plans that cover abortion drugs (and free birth-control pills), such mandates shouldn’t require insurers to provide such abortion drugs for free.

5. Even if any or all such mandates were justifiable, they shouldn’t be issued by the federal government but instead should be issued by state or local governments — a national decree entailing too much consolidation of power and control in Washington.

6. Even if any or all such mandates were issued by the federal government, they shouldn’t be issued under the specious legal justification that, under Obamacare, such mandates are promoting “preventive medicine” — a term whose plain meaning refers to preventing diseases or ailments, not to preventing conception or the subsequent development of that conceived being.

7. Even if any or all such mandates were issued by the federal government under this specious legal justification, they shouldn’t apply to religiously affiliated organizations whose moral teachings are contradicted by the use of such drugs.

Fortunately, there is a remedy for such a 7-fold abuse of governmental power: repeal.

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