The Blog

Slump or Fade Out?

12:12 PM, May 1, 2014 • By GEOFFREY NORMAN
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The president is in serious – perhaps, irreversible – political decline and the people who are paid to notice such things seem to be the last to have noticed.  But now, as Howard Kurtz of Fox writes, they are all over it.

President Obama’s media supporters are abandoning him. Even the liberal culture seems to be abandoning him. And as he slips into the low 40s in two recent polls, it’s hard to see how he recasts his once-glittering image.

Justin Sink of the Hill, meanwhile, wonders if the president can “get his groove back,” what with:

The botched rollout of ObamaCare, the government shutdown, an ongoing crisis in Ukraine and the fading glow of his reelection [having] taken their toll on the president’s ratings, leaving Obama mired in the low 40s.

At the White House, meanwhile, the political operators  leave nothing to chance, not even the random tweet.  As Oliver Knox at Yahoo News writes, there is someone on the president’s staff (paid, presumably) who:

… tracks journalists’ tweets and flags them in mass emails that land in the in-boxes of more than 80 Obama aides, including chief of staff Denis McDonough, White House counsel Kathy Ruemmler, press secretary Jay Carney and senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer.

This staffer vigilantly:

… watches the Twitter feeds of influential reporters for comments the White House might view as inaccurate, incomplete or unfair, as well as clues for what they are reporting and how it might portray the president or the administration.

The Obama administration, plainly, leaves nothing to chance when it comes to the ceaseless political conversation indulged in by the political class.

The White House may never lose an argument.  But after five years of economic doldrums, one foreign policy failure after another, and an endless string of pointless speeches, it finally seems to have lost the country.

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