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Social Conservatism and the GOP

10:35 AM, Feb 18, 2012 • By MICHAEL WARREN
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In his latest Weekend Interview, James Taranto of the Wall Street Journal discusses social conservatism and its positive influence on American politics (and on the Republican party) with Jeffrey Bell, author of The Case for Polarized Politics: Why America Needs Social Conservatism. Here's a taste of the interview:

If you're a Republican in New York or another big city, you may be anxious or even terrified at the prospect that Rick Santorum, the supposedly unelectable social conservative, may win the GOP presidential nomination. Jeffrey Bell would like to set your mind at ease.

Social conservatism, Mr. Bell argues in his forthcoming book, "The Case for Polarized Politics," has a winning track record for the GOP. "Social issues were nonexistent in the period 1932 to 1964," he observes. "The Republican Party won two presidential elections out of nine, and they had the Congress for all of four years in that entire period. . . . When social issues came into the mix—I would date it from the 1968 election . . . the Republican Party won seven out of 11 presidential elections."

The Democrats who won, including even Barack Obama in 2008, did not play up social liberalism in their campaigns. In 1992 Bill Clinton was a death-penalty advocate who promised to "end welfare as we know it" and make abortion "safe, legal and rare." Social issues have come to the fore on the GOP side in two of the past six presidential elections—in 1988 (prison furloughs, the Pledge of Allegiance, the ACLU) and 2004 (same-sex marriage). "Those are the only two elections since Reagan where the Republican Party has won a popular majority," Mr. Bell says. "It isn't coincidental."

Read the whole thing here. Also, be sure to read Matthew Continetti's review of The Case for Polarized Politics from the January 30 issue of THE WEEKLY STANDARD.

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