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Taking 'Buy Local' to the Extreme

5:04 PM, Feb 19, 2014 • By JIM SWIFT
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Buying local has, in recent years, become somewhat of a fad movement among trade unionists, greens, foodies, and anti-free traders. Believers in the movement -- usually the foodies -- often refer to themselves as “locavores.”

The rationale behind "Buy Local" is that by purchasing items made locally or sold by local merchants, more money is kept in the local economy and people are all supposedly better off than if they purchased lower cost goods that may be made more efficiently in a non-local setting, or sold by non-local retailers.

A Miami artist has taken what has been a niche, largely non-violent movement to the next level.

The New York Daily News reports:

Maximo Caminero, 51, told police the Sunday's incident at the Perez Art Museum Miami was an act of protest against the museum for not displaying local artists. Caminero was charged with criminal mischief for destroying [Ai] Weiwei's vase. 

Ai is a Chinese dissident known for his criticism of China's stances on human rights and democracy. The vase was valued at $1 million.

Caminero, a local painter born in the Dominican Republic, was charged with making criminal mischief.

This isn't the first time an individual has been arrested for criminal acts because of frustration from non-local competition. 

In 2012, Randol Stebner attempted to burn down a Home Depot in Washington state during National Small Business Week because it was "making business difficult for my friend." At the time, SeattlePI.com reported that Stebner admitted in a confession:

“I don’t want to hurt them [the people in the store], but I have to get their mother (expletive) attention. I only set one fire, but I want to set a couple more.”

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