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Ted Cruz Changes His Mind About Obamacare

Texas senator no longer thinks January 1 was the deadline to repeal the law.

5:44 PM, Jan 29, 2014 • By JOHN MCCORMACK
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During the summer and fall of 2013, Texas senator Ted Cruz repeatedly warned that it would be impossible to repeal Obamacare once Americans began receiving subsidies on January 1, 2014.

Ted Cruz

In the new year, Americans would become “hooked on the subsidies, addicted to the sugar,” Cruz told a Tea Party gathering in his home state on August 19, according to the Texas Tribune. “If we get to January 1, this thing is here forever.” This belief was a main justification for the last-ditch campaign to fund the government if, and only if, Obamacare was defunded.

But on a conference call Wednesday afternoon, a month after Obamacare subsidies began flowing, Cruz told reporters that he no longer believes that January 1 was the deadline to stop Obamacare. "I believe we will repeal Obamacare," he said.

The reason Cruz thinks the law can still be repealed is that he and others had the high-profile fight to defund Obamacare in the first place. "I think we are seeing the fruits of the battle that so many millions of Americans engaged in last fall to stop Obamacare," Cruz said. "I think the direct result of that fight was to elevate the national debate about the harms that Obamacare has caused. And as a consequence, I think the terrain has changed, and I believe we will repeal Obamacare."

"When you have more people who lost their health insurance under Obamacare than have gotten new insurance under Obamacare, that is a stunning indictment of the law," Cruz added. "Indeed, McKinsey & Company estimated that only 11 percent of those who have signed up for insurance under Obamacare were uninsured. That's roughly 330,000 Americans. So that contrasts to over 5 million who lost their health insurance. If the purpose of this law was to extend insurance to 330,000 people who were uninsured, it would have been a heckuva lot cheaper to write a check to those 330,000 people for a million bucks apiece. If we'd have done that, it would cost only one-sixth of what Obamacare is going to cost. And it wouldn't have caused over 5 million people to lose their health insurance. It wouldn't have caused millions of people to lose their jobs and be forced into part-time work, to see their premiums skyrocket."

"As long as we keep focusing on the substance, I believe the momentum is building and it will manifest itself in Obamacare being repealed," Cruz concluded.

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