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Video: Libyan Rebels Swim, Belly-Flop in U.S. Embassy Pool in Tripoli?

Or is it a U.S. 'residential compound'?

8:13 AM, Sep 1, 2014 • By DANIEL HALPER
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Here's video reportedly of Libyan rebels swimming (and doing a belly-flop) in the U.S. embassy pool in Tripoli:

And here's the raw video from the embassy:

"Libyans have overrun a residential compound abandoned by the American Embassy when it pulled out of Tripoli in July, according to a video circulated online Sunday. Dozens of gleeful trespassers could be seen gathered around a swimming pool inside the compound, and a few dived in from the second-floor balcony, all fully clothed," the New York Times reports.

Like most foreign governments, the United States withdrew its employees from Tripoli weeks ago because of the escalating clashes between rival militias from the western town of Zintan and coastal Misurata. The Zintanis accused the Misuratans of colluding with Islamists, and the Misuratans accused the Zintanis of conspiring in a counterrevolution. Both sides deny the claims.

It was unclear if the trespassers at the compound belonged to either faction. At least one young man by the pool was carrying a rifle. But another held what appeared to be a bottle of alcohol. Several could be seen recording the mayhem on mobile devices.

“Come on, Awad, I feel like you are taking too long,” one trespasser shouted to a companion hesitating before a dive from the balcony.

One American who was part of the evacuation said Zintani militiamen had moved into the residential compound as the United States pulled out. But almost all of the Zintani fighters fled over the last week after they lost control of the airport, leaving the Misuratans in control of the capital. There was no sound of shelling in the poolside video, so it appeared to have been recorded after the Zintanis fled and the guns went quiet.

The Times claims this is merely a "residential compound" and not the U.S. embassy. And the paper quotes an unnamed State Department official as saying, “At this point, we believe the embassy compound itself remains secure, but we continue to monitor the situation on the ground, which remains very fluid.”

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