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Warren: I Was 'First Nursing Mother' to Take Bar Exam in NJ

Plus, Cherokees demand truth.

9:27 AM, May 30, 2012 • By MICHAEL WARREN
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Massachusetts Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren claimed at an event in 2011 that she was the "first nursing mother" in New Jersey to take that state's bar exam. The Boston Herald reports:

“I was the first nursing mother to take a bar exam in the state of New Jersey,” Warren told an audience at the Chicago Humanities Festival in 2011, in a video posted on the CHF website. When asked how Warren knows that, her campaign said: “Elizabeth was making a point about the very serious challenges she faced as a working mom — from taking an all-day bar exam when she was still breast-feeding, to finding work as a lawyer that would accommodate a mom with two small children.”

The Herald goes on to point out that women have been taking the bar exam in New Jersey since 1895, and a spokeswoman for the New Jersey Judiciary says she is "not aware" if the state tracked the nursing habits of those taking the bar.

The unverifiable claim is only the latest from Warren, who is challenging Republican Scott Brown for the U.S. Senate.

Warren has also said, both on the trail and in her professional life, that she descended from Cherokee Indians, but has been unable to back up this claim with any facts. Now, according to William Jacobson at the blog Legal Insurrection, a group of Cherokee people have started a website (and a Facebook page) called "Cherokees Demand Truth from Elizabeth Warren." The group's message to Warren is, "You claim to be Cherokee. You forget, it isn't who you claim, but instead, who claims you. We don't claim you!"

Here's more, from the group's website:

We are a group of concerned enrolled Cherokees and descendants from the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes; the Cherokee Nation, the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians, and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; who demand that Elizabeth Warren tell the truth about her "Cherokee" ancestry and identity. Our group, 156 members strong and growing each day, is in it's infancy so we are, at this time, an informal one with no specific organizational structure. Spokespeople for the group are Twila Barnes and David Cornsilk. 

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