EDITORIAL

Paul Ryan’s America

BY WILLIAM KRISTOL

AP Photo

It’s a vision that says up to 50 million Americans have to lose their health insurance in order for us to reduce the deficit. Who are these 50 million Americans? Many are somebody’s grandparents, maybe one of yours, who wouldn’t be able afford nursing home care without Medicaid. Many are poor children. Some are middle-class families who have children with autism or Down’s syndrome. Some are kids with disabilities .  .  . so severe that they require 24-hour care. These are the Americans we’d be telling to fend for themselves.

President Barack Obama, April 13, 2011

Gary Locke illustration

The Incredible Shrinking Obama

BY PETER WEHNER

Barack Obama’s budget address last week ranks among the most dishonest and dishonorable presidential speeches in generations. It contained ...

Photo

In Defense of Defense

BY THOMAS DONNELLY

In his budget speech last week, Barack Obama mounted his third attack on U.S. defense spending. In 2009 the White House directed Defense Secretary Robert Gates to terminate more than $300 billion in weapons programs, including the F-22 Raptor, the world’s most capable aircraft, and the Army’s ...

ARTICLES

Obama vs. Ryan, Round Two

The president takes the low road.

BY FRED BARNES

Dave Malan

Paul Ryan, architect of the Republican budget for 2012, sat in the front row at George Washington University as President Obama delivered his thoughts on the deficit, debt, and Ryan’s spending plan. The White House had seated him there, directly in front of the president.

Obama spoke for 43 minutes. As he turned from side to side, from one teleprompter to the other, he never made eye contact with Ryan. Nor did he speak to Ryan before or after his speech.

Yet the president devoted a significant chunk of his address to denouncing Ryan’s budget as unserious and close to being ...

Photo

Budget Gamesmanship

The Republicans are winning the deficit debate.

BY TOD LINDBERG

There’s a truism of budgeting that goes: The player who makes the first move always loses. That’s because the player with the second move has the ...

AP Photo

A Spreading Revolt in Syria

Is Assad losing his grip?

BY TONY BADRAN

With the popular uprising in Syria completing its first month, protests against Bashar al-Assad’s regime have spread to encompass most Syrian ...

FEATURES

When Daniel Met Julian

The rise and fall of WikiLeaks

BY JONATHAN V. LAST

Julian and Daniel

During a span of 22 months the website WikiLeaks.org morphed from a digital anarchist demonstration project into a semisuccessful international campaign against the American government. WikiLeaks solicited classified documents and then orchestrated a global media typhoon around them. The site​—​literally​—​gave direction to institutions such as the New York Times, London’s Guardian, and Der Spiegel, dictating publication schedules and deciding which outlets would publish what information.

At its high-water mark in the spring and summer of 2010, WikiLeaks appeared to be a new kind of organism: part media company, part NGO, part hacker ...

Gamal Mubarak

Will They Be Devoured?

The children of Egypt’s revolution versus the military establishment in Cairo

BY LEE SMITH

Cairo

AP Photo

Unionsdämmerung

Despite having its best friend forever in the White House, the American labor movement is in mortal crisis

BY MARK HEMINGWAY

One of the most widely circulated photographs during the Wisconsin union battle was of a protester in Madison holding up a sign that read: “Dear Barack, Please put on your comfortable shoes. Love, America.”

While that sign may not have meant anything to the rest of the country, those in ...

Books & Arts

The Firm of Art

McKim, Mead, White and America’s design

BY EDWARD SHORT

Stanford White

Triumvirate

McKim, Mead and White: Art, Architecture, Scandal and Class in America’s Gilded Age

by Mosette Broderick

Knopf, 608 pp., $40

Andrew Marvell

Puritan in Verse

The poet-politician of the English Civil War gets his due.

BY BARTON SWAIM

Andrew Marvell

J. Peters

Red Puppeteer

The hidden life, in plain sight, of a Communist spymaster.

BY HARVEY KLEHR

Red Conspirator

‘Vision After the Sermon (Jacob Wrestling with the Angel)’ (1888)

Artist in Exile

Paul Gauguin in search of paradise.

BY DEBORAH DIETSCH

Gauguin: Maker of Myth

Steven Hill in ‘Running on Empty’

The Real Thing

Sidney Lumet, 1924-2011

BY JOHN PODHORETZ

The death of Sidney Lumet April 9 is a striking reminder of how little the American motion-picture industry today has in common with Hollywood in the 1960s and 1970s—which were his heyday and, arguably, the heyday ...

CASUAL

Philip Terzian, Ginger Man

BY PHILIP TERZIAN

Ginger Rogers

As an editor, I pay a certain amount of attention to centennials, bicentennials, sesquicentennials, and the like. This year, for example, is the centennial of the birth of William Golding, Spike Jones, and Hubert Humphrey and the sesquicentennial of the firing on Fort Sumter. But I was momentarily taken aback not long ago when I realized that it is also Ginger Rogers’s centennial. 

Of course, Fred Astaire’s dance partner is a generation older than I—for the record, I was born the week before her 39th birthday—and I never had anything remotely resembling a romantic interest in her. But I developed a youthful appreciation for Ginger Rogers, and for ...

SCRAPBOOK

Of Siblings and Sycophants

Ladder to the Moon

The Scrapbook confesses to a certain fascination with presidential siblings. In recent decades, some have been prominent figures in their own right​—​Dwight Eisenhower’s five brothers, the Bush and Kennedy clans​—​or solid citizens content to sit quietly backstage (Neil Reagan, Edward Nixon). But more than a few presidential siblings have earned the dreaded “colorful” sobriquet​—​evangelist Ruth Carter Stapleton, rock ’n’ roller Roger Clinton​—​and there is also what might be called a dishonor roll of siblings who have proved embarrassing to their brothers (Donald Nixon, Billy Carter). 

Barack Obama Sr. ...

PARODY

The Weekly Standard Archives

Browse 15 Years of the Weekly Standard

Old covers