EDITORIAL

Press the Advantage

BY GARY SCHMITT

Military

When you are in a fight and have your opponent down on the pavement with your boot on his neck, the last thing you want to do is step off. You keep the boot firmly planted, pressing even harder, until he yields. Otherwise it’s a certainty that he’ll get back up, start throwing punches again, and drag out a fight that should have been settled sooner.

Such is the case in Afghanistan with the American-led counterinsurgency against the Taliban and its jihadist allies. It’s becoming increasingly clear that we have the boot on our opponent’s neck. First, there was the killing of Osama bin Laden. While not directly related to the insurgency, the raid on ...

Paul Ryan

Fight to the Debt

BY YUVAL LEVIN

Normally in Washington, the agenda for spring and summer is set by the president’s budget and the priorities of congressional leaders. But this year ...

Obama

A Time for Choosing

BY LEE SMITH

President Obama, the Wall Street Journal reports, is preparing a speech that “will ask those in the Middle East and beyond to reject Islamic ...

ARTICLES

No More Red Ink

Republicans wade into the debt battle.

BY FRED BARNES

John Boehner

It was no accident that Marco Rubio, the senator from Florida, spoke first. Senate Republicans had adopted a division of labor for their session at the White House last week with President Obama. Eleven of them addressed the president, touching on spending cuts and raising the debt limit.

Rubio is the youngest (39) and most acclaimed freshman in the Republican caucus. He talked about his 80-year-old mother and Medicare. Republicans, Rubio said, don’t want to change Medicare for her and other current beneficiaries. Their aim is to ensure Medicare exists for later generations. That means reforms of Medicare must be taken up now.

Assad

The Illusion of Peace with Syria

Don’t even think of engaging with Assad.

BY ELLIOTT ABRAMS

The news from Syria grows grimmer by the day—more peaceful protesters killed, ten thousand arrested in the past week, army units shelling residential neighborhoods. 

Obama

Rich Irony

On taxes, the president is all talk and no action.

BY CHRISTOPHER CALDWELL

A mystery lies at the heart of America’s budget politics. In the weeks since debate began on raising the debt limit, President Obama has faulted Republican budget plans as a way of giving favors ...

Chinese Christians

The Crackdown Continues

The ongoing persecution of Christians in China.

BY MEGHAN CLYNE

Communist China has earned praise in the past few years for a perceived thaw in its strict opposition to religious observance—particularly Christianity. A visitor to China will see Christian churches out in the open; a printing ...

FEATURES

What I Saw at the Revolution

With a Libyan conservative in free Benghazi

BY ANN MARLOWE

Repatriated Youth

Benghazi

"How are they going to get all these guns off the street?”

Mohamed El Senussi, a grand-nephew of Libya’s first and only king, may be the only Burkean conservative in Benghazi’s newly dubbed “Freedom Square.”

It’s April 8, our first day in Benghazi, and we’re walking around Free ...

David Mamet and Family

Converting Mamet

A playwright’s progress

BY ANDREW FERGUSON

Santa Monica

Books & Arts

Folk Wisdom

The acoustic sound of midcentury America.

BY RONALD RADOSH

Woody Guthrie, 1943


Political Folk Music in America from Its Origins to Bob Dylan

by Lawrence J. Epstein

McFarland, 213 pp., $35

Reading Lawrence J. Epstein’s wonderful, lively, and politically incorrect survey of political folk music, a reader cannot help ...

R. G. Collingwood

Ideas Matter

One Englishman’s adventures in the life of the mind.

BY EDWARD SHORT

History Man

Abraham Lincoln

Lincoln’s Mantle

Claiming the legacy of the first Republican president.

BY JOHN B. KIENKER

Claiming ...

Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, 1951

Giant Yankee

Sometimes a great ballplayer is just a great ballplayer.

BY JOHN C. CHALBERG

The Last Boy

The Will to Give

The Will to Give

You can’t take it with you, but .  .  .

BY MARTIN MORSE WOOSTER

Give Smart

Paul Giamatti, Alex Shaffer

Getting to No

Why ‘Win Win’ Fails.

BY JOHN PODHORETZ

CASUAL

Muckraker

Mark Hemingway, muckraker.

BY MARK HEMINGWAY

Portapotty

Any journalist who has ever said anything worth saying—or in my case, more than a few things they regret—is all too familiar with hate mail. 

Years ago, someone hurled a rather bizarre insult into my inbox: “Why I bet you’ve never had calluses on your hands in your life!” I’m happy to report my hands are blissfully callus-free at the moment. Believe me, I’ve had much more unpleasant jobs.

One summer in college I worked at a port-a-potty place. I took the job because I was told I would not be dealing with the, uh, business end of portable toilets. The job was assembling new (read: unused) port-a-potties. 

SCRAPBOOK

Do-gooders gone wild, weight watchers, & more

Golden Gate Bridge

Do-Gooders Gone Wild

Liberals love to gripe about military spending. Just last week, Washington Post managing editor Raju Narisetti actually wrote on his Twitter account: “Thought encounter of the day: ‘Would be good if our schools are fully funded and DoD has to hold a bake sale to buy its next fighter jet.’ ” It would also be good if, à la Red Dawn, a ragtag band of plucky high school kids could drive an invading army out of Colorado—Wolverines!—but we’d best keep a few aircraft carriers around just in case. Considering that America’s worst school districts tend to be some of the best funded, Narisetti might consider this sentiment not so much a “thought” as an encounter with a bumper sticker likely to be ...

PARODY

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