EDITORIAL

Harbingers of Success

BY WILLIAM KRISTOL

Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher

Ronald Reagan’s defeat of Jimmy Carter in 1980, and the subsequent rapid American recovery at home and abroad, didn’t come out of the blue. There were plenty of signs before Election Day 1980 that such a reversal and triumph were possible:

* The late 1970s featured a broad-based rebellion throughout America against big-government, welfare-state liberalism—in the form of tax revolts at the state and national level, the rise of religious conservatism, and popular resistance to elite acquiescence in a foreign policy of weakness and ...

AP / Joe Raymond

'Enough'

BY GARY SCHMITT and THOMAS DONNELLY

In the next month, after more than four decades of distinguished public service including almost five extraordinary years at the Pentagon ...

Let Our Criminals Go?

Let Our Criminals Go?

BY TERRY EASTLAND

Last week the Supreme Court reentered the business of dubious liberal policymaking with its decision in a case from California, Plata v. ...

ARTICLES

From the Midwest to the West Wing

The formula for a winning GOP candidate.

BY JEFFREY H. ANDERSON

From the Midwest to the West Wing

From the moment the Democratic House passed Obamacare on March 21, 2010, it was clear that November 6, 2012, would be a defining moment in American history. It is not an exaggeration to say that, in many ways, that day will decide the future course of this country: Will our fellow citizens reelect President Obama and thereby ratify his signature legislative initiative, or will they reject both Obama and his namesake? Will they choose liberty and prosperity, or statism and insolvency?

Republicans will have a lot to do with providing the answers to these questions​—​especially those few who must decide whether to enter the presidential race. They should ...

Arnold

Manliness and Morality

The transgressions of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Dominique Strauss-Kahn.

BY HARVEY MANSFIELD

What with Arnold and DSK, male transgression is once again in the news. Let’s not equate the two cases—one is forgivable, the other, if the accusations ...

Obama

Obama in the Abstract

Spokesman for the ‘international community.’

BY TOD LINDBERG

Let’s assume that it was not President Obama’s intention for the final section of his big Mideast speech, in which he took up the subject of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, to entirely overwhelm everything he had ...

AP

The Politics of Defense Cuts

The president tries—and fails—to paint Republicans into a corner.

BY MICHAEL GOLDFARB

Not that long ago it looked like President Obama had Republicans right where he wanted them. As the debate over the 2011 budget played out on Capitol Hill, he threatened to veto the legislation if it cut one dollar ...

Seapower

A Day Without U.S. Seapower

It’s June 2025. Do you know where your fleet is?

BY BRYAN MCGRATH and MACKENZIE EAGLEN

The idea of a world without the benefit of preponderant American seapower may sound alarmist and farfetched. Unfortunately, those who ...

Law and Order

Law and Order

Targeted killing is legitimate and defensible.

BY KENNETH ANDERSON

Even before the successful raid against Osama bin Laden was announced, news that America’s most admired general, David Petraeus, would take the ...

Small Is Beautiful

Small Is Beautiful

Memo to GOP: Think less about corporate America, more about startups.

BY DAVID SMICK

In late 1979, during an economic strategy meeting, Ronald Reagan was talking about his upcoming presidential campaign. At one point, somebody ...

A Coming Arab Winter?

A Coming Arab Winter?

The Fatah-Hamas deal may presage a new Iranian approach to the Middle East.

BY LEE SMITH

It can’t give many Americans much lasting pleasure that the Israeli prime minister humbled our commander in chief this week on his home turf. To ...

Syria’s Nuclear Impunity

Syria’s Nuclear Impunity

Bashar al-Assad’s lengthening rap sheet.

BY JAMIE M. FLY and ROBERT ZARATE

Contrary to what the Obama administration might hope, Syrian president Bashar al-Assad is no reformer. Even with the Syrian government’s ...

Targeted by the EPA

Targeted by the EPA

Don't mess with Texas.

BY BETH HENARY WATSON

A three-inch lizard scuttled into the spotlight in ...

FEATURES

The Third Man

Missing from the Bibi vs. Barack drama in Washington was the man who really torpedoed the peace process, Mahmoud Abbas

BY ELLIOTT ABRAMS

The Third Man

The week of dueling speeches by President Obama and Prime Minister Netanyahu was great political drama, but a key character was missing from the scene: Palestinian Authority president Mahmoud Abbas. While Abbas was absent, it was in fact his creation on April 27 of a unity government with the terrorist group Hamas that provided the backdrop for what we saw in Washington. So an analysis of what happened last week must begin not with Bibi’s calculations or Obama’s, but those of Abbas.

Mahmoud Abbas is 76 years old and will retire from politics next year, having announced that he will not seek reelection. His tenure as chairman of both the Fatah movement ...

Books & Arts

The Reasons Why

Cause and effect in the Civil War.

BY EDWIN M. YODER JR.

The Civil War

The Union War

by Gary W. Gallagher

Harvard, 256 pp., $27.95

The Confederate War

by Gary W. Gallagher

Painting

An Obvious Secret

The monumental achievements of middle-class morality.

BY JAMES SEATON

The Bourgeois Virtues

Ethics for an Age ...

Broken Record

Broken Record

When the going gets tough, the tough sing ‘Besame Mucho.’

BY JOE QUEENAN

A friend, now long dead, once told me that when the Beatles were putting the finishing touches on their second album, they found themselves ...

Venice Observed

Venice Observed

Canals, commerce, and Carnival.

BY SARA LODGE

Venice

Midnight in Paris

Paris When It Fizzles

Isn’t it pretty to think what might have been?

BY JOHN PODHORETZ

Midnight in Paris

CASUAL

Mr. Rogers Among the Savages

Jonathan V. Last, neighbor

BY JONATHAN V. LAST

Mr. Rogers

I’ve been spending a lot of time with Fred Rogers lately. Mr. Rogers passed away in 2003, but he lives on in an endless series of television repeats on PBS stations across America. In life, he was celebrated as a secular saint and a national treasure. But now that he’s gone it’s clear he was more than that. 

For all of his sweetness, Mr. Rogers was a countercultural figure. His show, Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood, presented a liberal view of the world that often verged on self-parody. One episode I saw recently featured a nonsexist orange construction sign proclaiming “People at Work.” In another, Mr. Rogers made little bags of homemade ...

SCRAPBOOK

Horton Wins a Prize

Scrapbook

Scott Horton is the kind of bumbling, inept journalist who seems to exist only in novels. A writer for Harper’s and the Daily Beast, he constantly makes mistakes and fabulates, leaving a trail of corrections and retractions in his wake. But because he has the right politics, Horton keeps getting promoted until, last week, he ascended all the way to receipt of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. 

Handed out by the American Society of Magazine Editors each year, the NMA is more or less a Pulitzer for magazines, and Horton’s story was a blockbuster: He detailed how, in 2006, three ...

PARODY

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