EDITORIAL

Reagan Was Right

BY THE EDITORS

Ronald Reagan

We at The Weekly Standard have had plenty of advice for Republicans on how to criticize (and occasionally to support) Obama administration foreign and defense policies. But as the GOP presidential campaign heats up, it seems that some candidates are more tempted to imitate the foreign policy orientation of George McGovern or John Kerry than of Ronald Reagan. So we thought it might be useful to remind them of what Reagan said when he took on and defeated a Democratic incumbent. Here, then, are excerpts from Ronald Reagan’s acceptance speech to the 1980 Republican Convention:

When we move from domestic affairs and cast our eyes abroad, we see an equally sorry chapter on the record of the present administration. .  .  .

Mourning in America

Mourning in America

BY MATTHEW CONTINETTI

Trying to stay upbeat? Avoid the business section. Unemployment stands at 9.1 percent. Growth is narcoleptic. The housing market hasn’t hit bottom. Fears of a Greek default are roiling markets. The deficit is running more than a trillion dollars for the third ...

ARTICLES

The Democrats’ ‘Culture of Corruption’

With a party like his, why in the world did Anthony Weiner resign?

BY MARK HEMINGWAY

The Democrats’ ‘Culture of Corruption’

Anthony Weiner undoubtedly felt pressured these last few weeks to resign his House seat over his dishonesty and online sexual indiscretions. The leaders of his party, everyone from President Obama to House minority leader Nancy Pelosi on down, were publicly in agreement that he should go.

But from Weiner’s vantage point, the question must be asked in all sincerity: Why should he be the one to resign?

The recent history of congressional scandals suggests Weiner had little ...

Medicare card

Cutting off Granny

Medicare? Thanks, but no thanks.

BY JEFF BERGNER

In a few months my wife and I will turn 65 years of age. I guess we’re the proverbial grandpa and grandma that our political leaders aim to ...

Obama

Follower in Chief

Lead? President Obama would prefer not to.

BY FRED BARNES

We’ve had strong presidents and weak presidents, skillful presidents and incompetent presidents, mediocre presidents and just plain poor presidents. Barack Obama stands alone as ...

FEATURES

What Third World Women Want

According to first world feminists

BY CHARLOTTE ALLEN

What women want

Cambridge, Mass.

The good news about the conference earlier this year titled “Driving Change, Shaping Lives: Gender in the Developing World” was that no one said, “Women hold up half the sky.” The bad news was that someone might as well have uttered this chestnut, reputed to be one of Mao Zedong’s favorite Chinese proverbs and a perennial favorite of feminists.

The subtheme of the two-day event, sponsored by the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the women’s studies think tank that occupies what used ...

Jerusalem

Return to Sender

A foolish letter from ‘wise men’ on the Middle East

BY ELLIOTT ABRAMS

There is never a shortage of Middle East peace plans, and another has recently been proposed by a set of Washington luminaries—some with considerable Middle East experience and some with none at all. This new plan, dated June 23 and published in the New ...

Books & Arts

Breakfast at Truman’s

Betrayal, over easy.

BY WINSTON GROOM

Truman Capote, Katharine Graham

Tiny Terror
Why Truman Capote (Almost) Wrote Answered Prayers
by William Todd Schultz
Oxford, 208 pp., $17.95

Comes now William Todd Schultz, self-styled “psycho-biographer,” to explain the mystery of Truman Capote’s lamentable Answered Prayers, which almost finished him off as a viable author. In ...

Pope John Paul II, Mehmet Ali Agca

Old Man and the See

The last years of a historic papacy.

BY JONATHAN V. LAST

The End and the Beginning
Pope John Paul II—The Victory of Freedom, the Last ...

G.K. Chesterton

Seeker of Truth

A mind as wide as the legendary waistline.

BY EDWARD SHORT

G. K. Chesterton
A Biography

Charlotte's Web

Tangled Web

A children’s classic, and the moral dimensions of animal farming.

BY MATTHEW SCULLY

The Story of Charlotte’s Web
E. B. White’s Eccentric Life in Nature and the Birth of an American ...

C. K. Williams

Incongruous Light

Two poets illuminate their separate worlds.

BY WYATT PRUNTY

Master of Disguises

Tina Fey, Lindsay Lohan, 2004

Enter Laughing

A funny, but not so revealing, showbiz memoir.

BY ZACK MUNSON

Bossypants

Abraham Lincoln, George McClellan

Lincoln in the Foxhole

Our most eloquent president meets our greatest war.

BY JONATHAN D. HORN

Lincoln on War
edited by Harold Holzer

Noah Webster

Webster’s First

The pioneer who discovered the American language.

BY WILLIAM H. PRITCHARD

The Forgotten Founding Father
Noah Webster’s Obsession and the Creation of an ...

Téa Obreht

Balkan Dreams

A debut novel hovers among shadows and action.

BY JOHN SIMON

The Tiger’s Wife
A Novel

CASUAL

Two Fathers and a Wedding

Mary Katharine Ham on power-gardening

BY MARY KATHARINE HAM

Casual

There is an apple tree in my parents’ backyard. Its bark is blackened, limbs reaching unevenly and feebly into the sky. If an art-house filmmaker needed a metaphor for resilience in a war-ravaged country, he would choose this tree. It looks like it’s growing in spite of something, straining against some great force.

That great force is my father.

Ever since I can remember, the flora of our backyard has shrunk in the face of his single-minded determination to mold natural growth to his exact specifications.

SCRAPBOOK

The Jilting of Hefner

Hugh Hefner

In the midst of last week’s installments of the Anthony Weiner saga​—​rehab, further revelations, resignation​—​another minor media episode played itself out, a little less spectacularly, on the televised stage: Five days before the ceremony, Miss Crystal Harris bailed out on her planned wedding to Mr. Hugh Hefner. 

Everybody knows Hugh Hefner, of course: the founder of Playboy and professional bon vivant whose swinging bachelor lifestyle has been a staple of American pop culture since the Eisenhower era. But who is Crystal Harris? She turns out to be a 25-year-old ex-Playmate and aspiring singer​—​whose plans to wed, therefore, might not seem so remarkable, except that Hugh Hefner, at 85, is old enough to be her great-grandfather. 

PARODY

The Weekly Standard Archives

Browse 18 Years of the Weekly Standard

Old covers