EDITORIAL

Don’t Come Home, America

BY ROBERT KAGAN

Troops in Afghanistan

"America, it is time to focus on nation building here at home.” This was the core sound bite in President Obama’s speech announcing the drawdown of forces in Afghanistan, and it was an extraordinary statement. Of course, such sentiments have been uttered many times over the years. George McGovern’s “Come Home America” campaign theme in 1972 comes to mind, and we’re sure Patrick Buchanan, Ron Paul, Dennis Kucinich, and George Will have said either exactly that or something similar at one time or another.

Not since the 1930s has an American president struck such an isolationist theme in a speech to the American people, however. By juxtaposing the winding down of the war in Afghanistan with the need ...

Obama

‘We Don’t Estimate Speeches’

BY YUVAL LEVIN

On June 22, the Congressional Budget Office released its annual “Long-Term Budget Outlook.” To call the document grim would be a grave ...

You've got mail

We’ve Got Mail

BY WILLIAM KRISTOL

The mass email from BarackObama.com evaded our spam filter and made it into our ...

ARTICLES

America’s Labor Party

Is there anything Obama won’t do for unions?

BY FRED BARNES

Obama carrying the unions

How far will President Obama go to advance the interests of organized labor? Awfully far. We know this not only from the effort to keep Boeing from building a plane in a right-to-work state, South Carolina, but also from the way Delta Airlines is being railroaded into recognizing unions its employees have repeatedly rejected.

In June alone, the Obama administration adopted rules likely to discourage employers from hiring law firms that specialize in thwarting union organizing drives, and moved to shorten union certification campaigns, long a goal of organized labor.

Terrorists

The al Qaeda- Taliban Connection

Obama takes his eye off the ball.

BY BILL ROGGIO and THOMAS JOSCELYN

Joe Biden finally won an argument. President Obama’s decision to draw down U.S. forces in Afghanistan seems to move American policy toward Biden’s long-held view that the U.S. ...

Oil Rig

No Energy in the Executive

Can the Obama administration be compelled to approve offshore drilling?

BY ADAM J. WHITE

"At some point this must end. With a permit, or without.” With those words, an exasperated federal judge punctuated his latest decision ordering the Obama administration to ...

Mohammed VI

The King’s Speech

Morocco’s constitutional reform deserves support in Washington.

BY LEE SMITH

On July 1 Moroccans will vote on a set of constitutional changes proposed by their king, Mohammed VI. These new amendments guarantee the full equality of women and the rights of ...

Terminal Illness

At the Bottom of the Slippery Slope

Where euthanasia meets organ harvesting.

BY WESLEY J. SMITH

In 1992, my friend Frances committed suicide on her 76th birthday. Frances was not terminally ill. She had been diagnosed with treatable leukemia and needed a hip replacement. ...

Shooting themselves in the foot

Which Party Has a Tax Problem?

The media say Republicans, but it’s actually the Democrats.

BY JAMES PETHOKOUKIS

When a group of Republican senators recently voted to eliminate the $6 billion in tax subsidies handed out annually to the ethanol industry, hopes for a coming conservative ...

FEATURES

Broken Families, Broken Economy

The real obstacle to growth

BY MITCH PEARLSTEIN

Just Divorced

Don’t look now, but the fiscal mountain blocking our path is rockier than usually advertised. Why? Because even if House Budget chairman Paul Ryan prevails on every contentious detail of his long-term plan for prosperity, family fragmentation​—​more severe in the United States than in any other industrialized nation​—​will make it more difficult than generally assumed to balance our books. 

Very high rates of family breakdown, as it used to be known, are subtracting from what many American students learn in school and so holding them back economically. That harms the country by making millions of citizens less competitive than they should be in the ...

Bachmann

Queen of the Tea Party

The presidential campaign of Michele Bachmann

BY MATTHEW CONTINETTI

If she’d fallen backward, she’d have been killed. It was September 2009, during her second term in Congress, and a magazine had sent a photographer to shoot Michele Bachmann. He ...

Books & Arts

God and Man and Politics

A Christian perspective on the public square.

BY PETER BERKOWITZ

Prayer Breakfast

The City of Man

Religion and Politics in a New Era

by Michael Gerson & Peter Wehner

Moody, 144 pp., $19.99

It is commonly supposed that liberal democracy gives rise to a dangerous and insuperable ...

The Adams

Founding Partners

The Adams love affair, in word and deed.

BY EDWARD ACHORN

First Family

Queen Elizabeth II

The Reign Explained

An argument for Britain’s constitutional monarchy.

BY JAMES KIRCHICK

Monarchy ...

Un-superman

Un-superman

An ordinary German in extraordinary times.

BY SUSANNE KLINGENSTEIN

The Turbulent World ...

Travel Image

Poets of Mobility

The beckoning world, and closing ranks, of travel writers.

BY THOMAS SWICK

Last year I gave a reading in New York City, and talking to people afterwards I was struck by how many were also travel writers, or at least survivors of a travel-writing course. ...

Super 8 kid

Alien Corn

A Steven Spielberg-produced tribute to Spielberg could have used Spielberg.

BY JOHN PODHORETZ

Super ...

CASUAL

AC for D.C.

BY PHILIP TERZIAN

Attached to modern comforts

Returning home the other evening to an empty house from a three-day trip, I checked the thermostat in the darkened vestibule and noticed that the temperature was a few degrees higher than the setting. My alluring wife, who is more cost-conscious than I about such things, had left the air conditioner on at a responsible setting before leaving on her own (separate) trip. The house was comfortable, if perceptibly less cool than usual; but I was intent on unpacking and surveying the tokens and souvenirs I had accumulated during a sojourn in the Hudson Valley.

So it took awhile for the grim reality to sink in: At some calamitous instant between my wife’s departure from the homestead for New York City ...

SCRAPBOOK

Enough Already, Honor in Beirut, & more

 

Enough Already

Having reached a certain age, The Scrapbook finds itself taking more interest in probate news than we used to. And while we concede that it’s not exactly the stuff of Perry Mason or a juicy episode of Law and Order: Special Victims Unit, the little dramas of probate law teach us something about human nature.

When, for example, the reclusive, 104-year-old heiress Huguette Clark died in Manhattan six weeks ago, her lifelong desire for seclusion and anonymity was treated in the media as freakish, clear ...

PARODY

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