EDITORIAL

Republican Virtue

BY WILLIAM KRISTOL

Cicero Picture

O tempora, o mores! O Cicero, if thou couldst be with us now! The corruption of our age is approaching that of your own! Who today speaks for the ancient Roman—and modern American—virtues of civic duty and personal responsibility?

Here’s who: the House Republicans.

The federal government has a problem. It’s hitting a debt ceiling limit passed into law last year by the Democratic Congress, and signed by President Obama. It’s doing so because of appropriations passed by ...

Syrian Protestors Picture

Free Syria

BY LEE SMITH

The week of August 1 marks the beginning of Ramadan, the monthlong celebration that for many Muslims is the central event of the calendar. ...

ARTICLES

He Can’t Help Himself

Obama would rather pander than win.

BY FRED BARNES

Obama Shooting Himself in the Foot Picture

The path to ratification by Congress was greased after President Obama renegotiated trade treaties with South Korea, Colombia, and Panama. Obama would supply Democratic votes.  Republicans were already on board, President Bush having put together the treaties in the first place. It had the look of a done deal.

It wasn’t. In May, the White House suddenly insisted the treaties be accompanied by roughly $1 billion in Trade Adjustment Assistance, or TAA as it’s known in Washington. Organized labor was demanding TAA funds be set aside for workers whose jobs might be lost as a result of the treaties. Obama took up the cause. 

Obama and Warren Photo

Elizabeth Warren, Closet Conservative

The most misunderstood woman in Washington.

BY CHRISTOPHER CALDWELL

President Obama’s nomination of former Ohio attorney general Richard Cordray to head the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau may finish ...

Duke Lacrosse Players Acquitted Photo

The Noble Lie, Feminist Style

False accusations of rape are more common than you think.

BY CATHY YOUNG

We will probably never know for sure what really happened between former International Monetary Fund chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn and the ...

Teachers Union Protest Photo

Walker’s Vindication

The controversial Wisconsin budget reform saves teachers’ jobs.

BY JOHN MCCORMACK

Emily Koczela had been anxiously waiting for months for Wisconsin governor Scott Walker’s controversial budget repair bill to take ...

Angela Merkel Photo

The Euro Endgame

At last, the voters

BY ANDREW STUTTAFORD

Billion by billion by billion, showdown by argument by ultimatum, Greece’s latest bailout is being put together by those who run the ...

Gas Station Photo

New York Times Passes Gas

Calls it ‘news.’

BY STEVEN F. HAYWARD

By now just about everyone has jumped on board the natural gas bandwagon (see “The Gas Revolution,” April 18, 2011). Its newfound abundance inside the four corners ...

Men Panning for Gold Picture

Gold Standard or Bust

Fixing the dollar before it’s too late

BY JUDY SHELTON

As the truth-or-dare battle over raising the debt ceiling moves toward a resolution of some sort, we are witnessing a unique political ...

FEATURES

Rolling Back the Nanny State

One red-light camera at a time

BY JONATHAN V. LAST

Red Light Camera Photo

Last March the city council in San Bernardino voted 5-0 to kill their red-light camera system. Since the cameras were installed in 2005, the program had brought them little but grief. In 2008, the city was caught shortening the timing of yellow lights in order to gin up more citations. Later that year a California appellate court ruled that the city’s contract with the red-light camera service American Traffic Solutions (ATS) was in violation of state law. And in 2010, a county court ruled that images from red-light cameras were inadmissible hearsay. The cameras were such a debacle for San Bernardino that in the end the city paid ATS $110,000 to get out of a contract that would have kept the cameras in place until 2014.

Government Forces Fluorescent Bulbs Picture

Let There Be Light, Sickly Blue Light

Goodbye, incandescent bulb. Salvation comes from the compact fluorescent lamp.

BY JOSEPH BOTTUM

In the beginning, there was a glade. A green and foresty place, a meadowy clearing in the great big woods. The robins called from branch to ...

Books & Arts

What Price Tenure?

Pretty high, unless you have it.

BY HELEN RITTELMEYER

Professor Ward Churchill Picture


Until it was amended in 1994, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act included an exception for universities, permitting them to set a mandatory retirement age of 70 for tenured faculty. Out of all America’s employers, universities were among the handful that Congress worried would be overburdened with seventysomethings not exhausted by decades at their jobs, not enticed by the relaxations of retirement, not removable by some sort of performance review, and yet nowhere near valuable enough to justify their salaries. It’s possible that Congress suspected what Naomi Schaefer Riley has tried to prove: that tenured professors have ...

Crater caused by a suicide bomber photo

Suicide by Bomb

Misunderstanding a weapon in the terrorists’ arsenal.

BY MAX BOOT


Albert Brooks, 2011 Photo

Future Imperfect

Albert Brooks writes a novel. He should stick to film.

BY ZACK MUNSON


Albert Brooks is a comedian and filmmaker. He has now written a novel. The novel is called ...

Kennedy and Khrushchev Picture

Eyeball to Eyeball

Our guy blinked, with the following results.

BY JAMES DELMONT

The timing for this book is exquisite. Fifty years ago this summer, an embattled Soviet leader in a power struggle with an inner-circle hardliner was pushed to offer a young, ...

Avatar Picture

Say, What?

Movies make plenty of noise, but don’t speak to us.

BY JOHN PODHORETZ

Do movies matter? 

When I first became interested in them, in the 1970s, ...

CASUAL

For the Record

David Skinner, Witness

BY DAVID SKINNER

Skinner Boys Photo

Walking around the block recently, looking at the foundation of a new house going up, I remembered one of the most important days of my life. I was five years old. My parents had purchased a house—this was in Queens in 1978—on a double lot. They split the property in two and were building a second house on the empty half. The plan was for us to move into the new house when it was finished and sell the old house.

My father, an architect, had designed the new house, which at this point was only a cement foundation—what would soon be our basement floor, some 10 feet down, with walls that rose to ground level. It looked like a huge open cement box ...

SCRAPBOOK

Headache Hysteria

The Scrapbook was amused last week when it was revealed that Republican representative Michele Bachmann of Minnesota suffers from migraines and occasionally takes medication for them. Not amused by the migraines, of course—from which The Scrapbook occasionally suffers, too, and which are no fun—but by the fact that Bachmann’s rivals and detractors should have resorted to such a transparent, not to say sexist, device to undermine her presidential candidacy.

On the matter of migraines, at any rate, it didn’t work. The congresswoman was obliged to release a letter from the attending physician of the House, attesting to Bachmann’s good health ...

PARODY

The Weekly Standard Archives

Browse 15 Years of the Weekly Standard

Old covers