EDITORIAL

About Inequality

BY MATTHEW CONTINETTI

Photo of a Wall Street protestor

Over the last few weeks the ground of American politics has shifted to the left. The process began when President Obama’s tour to promote his jobs bill improved his standing in some polls and forced Republicans to play defense. Next came Occupy Wall Street, which gave the media an excuse to put questions of “social justice” at the top of their agenda. The Congressional Budget Office then released a report highlighting increased income inequality and seeming to prove Occupy Wall Street’s claim that the top 1 percent of Americans might as well live in a different country. Toss in a couple glimmers of economic hope—an improved third-quarter GDP number, a slightly falling unemployment rate—and the recipe for the left-liberal revival was set.

Photo of Reagan with Bush

It’s Not 1980 Anymore

BY WILLIAM KRISTOL

For every Southern boy 14 years old, not once but whenever he wants it, there is the instant when it’s ...

Photo of Mitt Romney

The Romney Plan

BY STEPHEN F. HAYES

Is this finally a Mitt Romney that conservatives can love? Or at least support?

ARTICLES

Come on in, the Earth Is Fine

With its 7 billionth person stunt, the U.N. boosts the overpopulation hysteria.

BY JONATHAN V. LAST

Cartoon of officials freaking out about a new baby

Last week the United Nations Population Fund released a report heralding the birth of the world’s 7 billionth person. The milestone is important, the United Nations explains, because their calculations now project that global population is likely to hit 9.3 billion by 2050 and could go as high as 15.8 billion by the end of the century. As you might imagine, these dire warnings were greeted with eager and solicitous concern by the alarmist media.

“Population Growth Taxing Planet’s Resources,” announced one Washington Post story. CNN tried to contextualize the number 7 billion by helpfully informing readers, “Seven billion ants, at an average ...

Photo of David Cameron at a press conference

The Tory Rebellion

Cameron picked a bad time to make his party more Europe-friendly.

BY CHRISTOPHER CALDWELL

London

Photo of Fred Upton of Michigan

Deal or No Deal

All eyes are on the supercommittee.

BY FRED BARNES

The 12 members of the congressional supercommittee aren’t isolated and alone, working like monks, as they pursue at least a $1.2 trillion ...

Photo of Palestinian foreign minister Riyad al-Malki

The UNESCO Follies Are Back

The Obama administration bungles the Palestinians’ membership vote.

BY JOHN R. BOLTON

The Palestinian Authority succeeded last Monday in becoming a member state in the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The vote was 107 in favor, 14 opposed, and 52 abstaining, ...

Chalkboard with names written on them in Arabic

Life in Libya

So far: less poor, less nasty, and less brutish than under Qaddafi.

BY ANN MARLOWE

Tripoli

FEATURES

Dogs and Cats Living Together

A Tea Party-Occupy Wall Street agenda

BY PETER J. HANSEN

Photo of a Tea Party gathering

What if the two prominent grassroots movements of the day, the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street, joined forces to support an agenda that would be good for America? 

Both groups are short on policy specifics. As popular movements, they lack organizers and spokesmen; both are to some extent expressions of mood. Nonetheless, there are several policies that reflect the concerns of at least a large part of both groups and that would be beneficial for the ordinary Americans whom both claim to represent. These policies would be a departure, however, from the current positions of the Democratic and Republican parties—whose shortcomings caused the two movements to spring up in the first place. So here it is, the Tea Party-Occupy ...

Photo of an American soldier in a desert

They Can Do It

Our troops can win in Afghanistan. But the key battleground is in Washington.

BY MAX BOOT

Kabul

Books & Arts

‘The Habit of Art’

Flannery O’Connor, illustrator

BY KATHERINE EASTLAND

Drawing of a family sitting in a living room

Milledgeville, Georgia

In 1955 Flannery O’Connor wrote to her friend Elizabeth McKee that “the only way to get here”—her home, the antebellum farm Andalusia—“is by bus or buzzard.” Yet many came to see her, and many still come. In fact, there’s a small sign to let you know where to turn off Highway 441 for Andalusia—it’s right across the street from a barbeque place—but the sign is so small you might mistake it for a back or side entrance. Go past the sign, and within a few minutes’ drive you’ll see O’Connor’s red-roofed house set on a slight hill and girded by pecan trees.

Painting of Cardinal Richelieu

Cardinal of State

Richelieu and the invention of modern France.

BY KENNETH WEINSTEIN

For the past three centuries and a half, Cardinal Richelieu has captivated students of politics. 

Painting of a saintly-looking figure

Oh, By the Way.  .  .

I should acknowledge that I’m extraordinary.

BY JOE QUEENAN

Have you noticed that whenever a newspaper columnist uses the phrase “full disclosure,” it’s primarily for purposes of ...

Name tag that says "Hello, I'm Steve"

Manners in Disguise

What seems like familiarity just might be deference.

BY STEPHEN MILLER

My wife and I—we are in our early seventies—sit down in a local restaurant. After handing us menus, the waitress returns a few minutes later: “Are ...

Photo of Sponge Bob

SpongeBob 101

The philosophical approach to high and low culture.

BY DAVID GUASPARI

Superheroes: The Best of Philosophy and Pop Culture expounds Immanuel Kant’s defense of retribution as a duty intimately related to ...

Photo of actress Felicity Jones

In Love with Love

A new rendition of an old-fashioned theme.

BY JOHN PODHORETZ

The swoony romantic drama, once a staple of the cinema, is all but nonexistent now. These movies—the ones that immortalized the longing glance, the ...

CASUAL

Kindle at the Cleaners

Joseph Epstein, by the book

BY JOSEPH EPSTEIN

Cartoon of a kindle at the cleaners

The other day I asked my five-years-younger-than-I brother—the wit in our family—if he had taken to using a Kindle. “My Kindle,” he said, “is at the cleaners.” I’m not sure why I found that funny, but I did, and still do, and take it that he means he would never think of using this new aid to reading with which so many people are so very pleased. 

If I owned a Kindle, I, too, would take it to the cleaners but never bother to pick it up. I’m sure that this miraculous new device has lots to be said for it in the realm of convenience (many books can be stored in it at once) and ease of handling (it’s much lighter than most hardcover books), but ...

SCRAPBOOK

For Better or for a Couple of Months

Photo of Ethel Merman and Ernest Borgnine

The Scrapbook, which is a strong believer in the institution of marriage, couldn’t help but notice the collapse of the 72-day-old union of Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries last week. Readers will be forgiven for not necessarily recognizing the name of either the groom or bride​—​he’s a second-tier professional basketball player, she is difficult to characterize in a single phrase​—​but anyone who has stood recently in a supermarket checkout line or watched cable television should be aware of their glittering nuptials (Lindsay Lohan attended!) and the now-disputed price of the 20.5-carat wedding ring ($2 million). 

Anyhow, after all the ...

PARODY

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