EDITORIAL

Trust the People

BY WILLIAM KRISTOL

Mitt Romney

Put not your trust in judges​—​nor in other berobed or bejeweled personages. To the degree you trust anyone: Trust the people.

Meaning?

Conservatives shouldn’t count on the Supreme Court to do our work for us on Obamacare. The Court may rule as it should, and strike down the mandate. But it may not. And even if it does, the future of health care in America​—​and for that matter, the future of limited government​—​depends ultimately on the verdict of the American people.

Abraham Lincoln and Mitt Romney

The Party of Lincoln

BY MATTHEW CONTINETTI

Here’s where the presidential debate stands. Mitt Romney seems comfortable arguing for a Bain Capital-style turnaround of the economy, and the many ...

Hillary Clinton

Impotence Abroad

BY LEE SMITH

Hillary Clinton says that the Obama administration can’t do anything about Bashar al-Assad. They can’t make him step down, and they can’t stop him from ...

ARTICLES

Victory at Sea

The Battle of Midway at 70.

BY GEOFFREY NORMAN

A Navy ship at sea

In the six months after its surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese Navy sailed from one victory to another, across the Pacific and into the Indian Ocean, until it seemed as though it was not merely unbeaten, but unbeatable. The Japanese conquered everything they attempted to conquer—including the Philippines and Singapore—and they defeated every fleet they encountered. Perhaps the most heavily symbolic of those early victories was the Battle of the Java Sea, in which a force of cruisers and destroyers fighting as part of something known as American-British-Dutch-Australian (ABDA) Command, was routed and its commander, Rear Admiral Karel Doorman, killed when his flagship, the Dutch cruiser De Ruyter, was hit by a Japanese torpedo that blew up one of the ship’s magazines.

Asian-Americans

The New Jews

They're Asian Americans.

BY ETHAN EPSTEIN

Like many colleges and universities, Princeton professes its devotion to “institutional equity and diversity.” The university’s website claims that the ...

Money going down the drain

Europe’s Political Contagion

From financial failure to institutional collapse.

BY ANDREW STUTTAFORD

That the eurozone has been reduced to a financial and economic shambles was predictable. How little that has changed the continent’s politics was not. To ...

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

Bride of Stuxnet

Webcraft as spycraft.

BY JONATHAN V. LAST

Last April, the Iranian Oil Ministry and the National Iranian Oil Company noticed a problem with some of their computers: A small number of machines were ...

Mitt Romney meets with students in West Philadelphia

Learning from Failure

An education agenda for Mitt Romney.

BY FREDERICK M. HESS AND ANDREW P. KELLY

The Republican presidential candidates have spent the past year saying little about education. When they have addressed the issue, it has often been in ...

Woman at Bankia ATM

Bankia? No Thankia.

Political hacks capture Spanish finance.

BY CHRISTOPHER CALDWELL

In a beautiful poem called “The Capital,” W. H. Auden talks about rich people “waiting expensively for miracles to happen.” That is what is happening in ...

Jesse Kelly and friends

Tussle in Tucson

A tight race for the Giffords seat.

BY KATE HAVARD

The special election to fill the last six months of Gabrielle Giffords’s term in the Eighth Congressional District of Arizona is rapidly approaching. ...

An Armenian man at the polls

Tractors for Votes

Democracy in Armenia.

BY ALEC MOUHIBIAN

Yerevan, Armenia

Barack Pinocchio Obama

Barack Pinocchio Obama

Facts are stubborn things

BY FRED BARNES

Are the media beginning to catch on to President Obama? The answer is a tentative yes. This doesn’t mean the press is softening its hostility to Mitt Romney. Heaven forbid! But at least for now Obama is getting razzed by the very people who used to uphold and defend him.

It’s about ...

FEATURES

Un-conventional

The Libertarian Party does Vegas

BY MARK HEMINGWAY

The Libertarian Party

Las Vegas

The Libertarian party probably rejected any claim to normalcy from the get-go by holding its convention in a casino. The Republicans and Democrats hold their conventions in Tampa and Charlotte in a few months, but America’s third largest political party held its nominating convention from May 2-6 at the Red Rock Resort on the edge of Las Vegas. Delegates selected former New Mexico governor Gary Johnson as their presidential candidate. News of Johnson’s nomination garnered a few obligatory headlines but was mostly met with a collective shrug by the political media. The lack of interest in the Libertarian party is a bit mystifying, given that voters routinely ...

Books & Arts

Where's the Beef?

In Vienna, and boiled the old-fashioned way.

BY VICTORINO MATUS

Shoulder cut of boiled beef

Vienna

In March I flew 4,464 miles to eat boiled beef. I admit this sounds absurd. After all, couldn’t I boil the meat at home? And why even bother boiling when I can braise, roast, or grill? Who would do such a thing to beef? 

The Austrians, that’s who—and they’ve been doing it for a long time. 

At the turn of the last century, during the height of the Habsburg ...

Donkey and Elephant friends

Elephantiasis

Everything, apparently, can be blamed on Republicans.

BY JAY COST

If there is one thing that Thomas E. Mann and Norman J. Ornstein want you to take away from their new book, it’s that the Republican party is ...

Retromania by Simon Reynolds

Back Beat

Pop music settles comfortably into Oldies idolatry.

BY ALEC SOLOMITA

The pop music critic Simon Reynolds marches to the beat of his own synthesizer. This literate, romantic, clever writer has devoted his career to ...

Jeremy Lin

Unselfish Basketball

Why Jeremy Lin's progress strikes a chord.

BY FRED BARNES

There’s a big hole in the National Basketball Association playoffs. A riveting storyline went AWOL. A level of excitement that might have ...

Mount Vesuvius

Fools for Lava

The timeless beauty, and obvious danger of Mount Vesuvius.

BY AMY HENDERSON

Two million people live in the shadows of Mount ...

Kristen Stewart as Snow White

Grimm Tidings

This is funny, but it’s not supposed to be.

BY JOHN PODHORETZ

Snow White and the Huntsman is the second revisionist retelling of the fairy tale this year. Mirror Mirror, the one with ...

CASUAL

James Abdnor, 1923-2012

BY JOSEPH BOTTUM

James Abdnor

When he died on May 16, the New York Times miscaptioned the photograph it ran with his obituary. And then misspelled his name in the correction it ran three days later. 

Jim Abdnor would have smiled, I think, or mumbled something shy. And sly. He had a strangely private sense of humor that didn’t seem to mind if no one else got the joke—which he may well have needed, looking back on his political career in South Dakota: a conservative whose single term in the U.S. Senate was bracketed by the 18 years of George McGovern that came before and the 18 years of Tom ...

SCRAPBOOK

Notes on Nanny Bloomberg

Mayor Bloomberg

Mayor Michael Bloomberg made headlines last week with his plan to prohibit the sale of sugary drinks in New York City in any size larger than 16 ounces. “Public health officials,” the mayor said, “are wringing their hands” over rising rates of obesity. But “New York City is not about wringing your hands; it’s about doing something. I think that’s what the public wants the mayor to do.”

The Scrapbook, for its part, is all about the handwringing. And two things about this story have us wringing ours: (1) This is a preview of the future under Obamacare. Once you socialize health care costs, you license the Michael Bloombergs of the world, at every level of government, to busy themselves intruding on the minutiae of what we used to ...

PARODY

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