EDITORIAL

Life of Henry

BY MATTHEW CONTINETTI

Life of Henry

In May, the Obama campaign unveiled its “Life of Julia,” a website detailing “how President Obama’s policies help one woman over her lifetime​—​and how Mitt Romney would change her story.” Julia is a composite character, the invention of one of the several hundred minions toiling away at Obama headquarters in Chicago. She is intended to illustrate, in a literal and rather vulgar way, the benefits of the entitlement state, from Head Start to student loans to Obamacare.

But Julia and people like her are not the sole residents of the United States. Nor is America divided simply between superrich plutocrats who make up 1 percent of the country and desperate beneficiaries of government largesse who make ...

President Barack Obama

Obama's Fantasy World

BY LEE SMITH

The White House wants you to know there’s much more to Obama’s foreign policy than meets the eye. Sure, it might seem that the president has lost the thread, and that ...

Mitt Romney

A Campaign Altogether Old

BY WILLIAM KRISTOL

A new political science is needed for a world altogether new. But that is what we hardly dream of: placed in the middle ...

ARTICLES

When Bankers Behave Badly

Mitt Romney should call them on it.

BY IRWIN M. STELZER

Mitt Romney

Where’s the outrage? No, not at President Obama’s performance, foreign and domestic, or his airbrushing the past three years of his failed economic policies out of the history books. That particular outrage Mitt Romney is taking good care to express as part of his strategy of concentrating on Obama’s failures rather than risk proposing policies to return morning to America. But where is the Republican candidate’s outrage at some of those who might be considered his own friends and allies?

Just because Obama attacks “fat cat” bankers in one of his ...

Congressman Justin Amash.

Party of One

Meet Michigan’s Justin Amash.

BY MICHAEL WARREN

After contacting the congressional office of Justin Amash and expressing my interest in interviewing the 31-year-old libertarian ...

Sign protesting Obamacare

The GOP’s Big Tent

Opposition to Obamacare unites Republicans.

BY JOHN MCCORMACK

When the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 on June 28 to let Obama-care stand, President Obama said that “it’s time for us to move forward.” Harry Reid implored his colleagues and countrymen to ...

Mitt Romney

Romneyconomics

Good but incomplete.

BY LEWIS E. LEHRMAN

Mitt Romney has articulated the choice we will make in November. We can choose President Obama and a European future—i.e., high unemployment, demographic winter, big government ...

The darker side of the internet...

Creeps on My Website

The dark side of search engines.

BY YING MA

It was April 2011, and my book had just been published. Chinese Girl in the Ghetto is a memoir of my family’s ...

FEATURES

Man with a Plan

How Paul Ryan became the intellectual leader of the Republican party

BY STEPHEN F. HAYES

ryan, romney

Kenosha, Wisc.

Paul Ryan has come to Kenosha to deliver bad news. It’s May 3, 2012, and the United States faces an imminent debt crisis. The federal government is spending too much. Entitlements are out of control. Social Security is going insolvent. Medicare is sucking up an ever-increasing chunk of our tax dollars. There are too many retirees and too few workers to support them. And both political parties are responsible for the unholy ...

Books & Arts

The Pill Perplex

‘Liberation’ and its consequences.

BY JONATHAN V. LAST

Adam and Eve After the Pill: Paradoxes of the Sexual Revolution by Mary Ebersta

‘Contraceptive sex,” writes Mary Eberstadt, is “the fundamental social fact of our time.” 

Eberstadt argues that the invention of the pill and near-mastery of contraception in the West during the 1960s caused a cascade of epochal consequences. Just to tally a few of the big-ticket items: It uncoupled sex from reproduction, caused people to have sex earlier and marry later, increased divorce, cohabitation, and illegitimacy, revolutionized the economic role of women, imploded the fertility rate, and set the modern welfare state on the course to insolvency. The sexual revolution unleashed by contraceptive sex, says Eberstadt, rivals the Communist revolution in terms of its influence on the world of the 20th century.

She’s almost certainly right. And the comparison of the two revolutions stems not just from the ...

New York Yankees

Yanks Are Coming

Two ways of looking at our most successful baseball club.

BY DAVID GUASPARI

Damn Yankees is a bathroom book, which I mean in the nicest way: short, generally entertaining, with essays from authors often better known as writers than as ...

John Stuart Mill

Uncivil Tongues

Should ‘ hate speech’ trump our principle of free expression?

BY JOSEPH BOTTUM

It’s John Stuart Mill’s world. Jeremy Waldron is just living in it. Not that Waldron isn’t a smart guy in his own right. A law professor at NYU and Oxford, the author of 10 books, one of Ronald Dworkin’s favorite students, and a leading figure in ...

Reinhold Niebuhr, 1959

Howdy, Niebuhr

Theologian, philosopher, and sage in one package.

BY JORDAN MICHAEL SMITH

When Reinhold Niebuhr died in June 1971, the New York Times obituary described him as “a theologian who preached in the marketplace, a philosopher of ethics who applied his belief to everyday moral ...

William Faulkner, 1950

Modernist Master

Fifty years since his death, we remain in Faulkner’s shadow.

BY EDWIN M. YODER JR.

April seventh, 1928: Through the fence, between the curling flower spaces, I could see them hitting. They were coming toward where the flag was and I went along the fence. Luster was hunting in the grass by the flower tree. They took the flag out and they were ...

Steven Soderbergh, 2011

Magic Steven

A prodigious filmmaker at the crossroads.

BY JOHN PODHORETZ

The Oscar-winning director Steven Soderbergh, who has had the most interesting career of any hotshot American filmmaker over the past quarter-century, is tired, he says. Tired of making movies. He’s either going to retire or take a sabbatical. This is a very ...

CASUAL

Ex Post Facto

Philip Terzian, former newspaperman.

BY PHILIP TERZIAN

Newspaper boy

I first began reading the Washington Post sometime in 1956-57, whenever I learned to read in the course of first grade. One of my parents had declared that newspapers were deliberately written at a fifth-grade level, and I was determined to find out what “fifth-grade level” meant. I discovered that it meant slightly incomprehensible to a 6-year-old; but the four comics pages were a reasonable point of entry, and from there I graduated by stages to the status of daily newspaper reader. 

In those days, the Post called itself the Washington Post and Times-Herald, having purchased Cissy Patterson’s old outlet in 1954, and there were two other local competitors: ...

SCRAPBOOK

Reston-Broder Syndrome Claims Victim

Dana Milbank

Dana Milbank is a Washington Post columnist whose progressive politics and world-weary posture have earned him coveted berths in the Post’s opinion and news pages. The Scrapbook wishes him the best. But The Scrapbook is also worried that, at 44, Milbank is showing signs of early-onset Reston-Broder Syndrome. 

This is a mood disorder, primarily confined to members of the press, which manifests itself by repeated assertions that political conditions cannot possibly be worse than they are at present, and that there was once a Golden Age to which the sufferer would like to return.

PARODY

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