EDITORIAL

In Praise of Half Measures

BY YUVAL LEVIN

Immigration Reform

As soon as the presidential election was over and the exit polling results began to pour in, some on the right (and many outside it) started arguing that the Republican party needed to change its tune on immigration. To avoid being left behind by the country’s changing demographics, the argument goes, the GOP must vastly improve its appeal to Hispanic voters, and the way to do this is to hop on the bandwagon of “comprehensive immigration reform,” which means a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million immigrants now in our country illegally, greater openness to more legal immigration, and the promise of better border security in the future, all in one grand ...

The Capitol Building

Win the Winnable

BY FRED BARNES

First, the problem. In 2010, Republicans failed to capture winnable Democratic Senate seats in Delaware, Nevada, and Colorado. The reason: bad candidates. In 2012, Republicans ...

An Israeli Iron Dome battery launches an interceptor missile.

The West Fights Back

BY WILLIAM KRISTOL

There are some facts so obvious that only a liberal could deny them. One of them is that, from Benghazi to Be’er Sheva, the West is under attack.

ARTICLES

Why Romney Lost the ‘Asian Vote’

Drill down into the numbers, and it’s not a surprise.

BY MICHAEL WARREN

Why Romney Lost the Asian Vote

Falls Church, Va.
Turning off U.S. 50 at a chaotic six-way intersection onto Wilson Boulevard, you can just see the red roof of the clock tower at Eden Center. A replica of the Ben Thanh market in old Saigon, the clock tower peeks out above the shops of this Asian shopping mall seven miles west of Washington, D.C. Buildings here go by names like “Saigon East,” “Saigon West,” and “Saigon Gardens.”

The colorful and ornate Imperial-style gate entrance into the parking lot is impressive. Two stone lions maintain ...

The destroyed house of a Hamas official in Gaza

Winners & Losers

The Gaza war and its fallout.

BY ELLIOTT ABRAMS

If the truce announced in Cairo last Wednesday truly brings the Gaza war to a close, it is not too soon to assess who gained and who lost from this conflict.

Romney posters the day after

After the Tumult and the Shouting

A dyspeptic election.

BY JAY COST

If I had to choose one word to describe the 2012 presidential ...

Generating plant at Niagara Falls, Ontario: More of this, eh?

By the Rivers of .  .  . Quebec?

The cheap, green answer to our electricity needs.

BY ELI LEHRER

Jake Irving looks excited. Sitting at a table in a noisy Washington, ...

FEATURES

Charity Begins in China

The good works done by Christians after the 2008 earthquake have led Beijing to ease up on private philanthropy

BY JILLIAN KAY MELCHIOR

Refugees

The day after Long Cai Bin was baptized, an earthquake destroyed his hometown. But it might have opened his country to his faith.

On May 12, 2008, Long was sitting outside his door in Beichuan, a city in China’s Sichuan Province, when his chair began to shake. The ground shook with it, and people started fleeing the surrounding buildings. When they saw Long, they were attracted by his calmness, and they clung to him, looking for guidance.

“My first thinking was ...

Books & Arts

Winston’s Table Talk

Churchill and the art of delicious conversation.

BY TRACY LEE SIMMONS

Winston Churchill, Henry Luce, 1949

It was Lord Birkenhead who said that Winston Churchill, a friend of decades’ standing, was a man always “easily satisfied with the best.” This sharp declaration could cut in sundry ways, of course, and Churchill’s friends could have as much sport with him as his enemies did: It was Birkenhead who also said that “Winston has devoted the best years of his life to preparing his impromptu speeches.” Cutting, indeed—but one senses more than a few drops of affection dripping from these ladlings of wit. They were amused attempts to bring greatness down to where we commoners could see and understand it.

Some characters of history’s drama cannot readily be summed up. Little wonder, then, that we’re eager to get at them ...

Tom Wolfe

Miami Vise

A Cuban-American cop gets caught in a web of allegiances.

BY BRIAN MURRAY

It’s been almost 25 years since Tom Wolfe issued a call for “the new social novel.” His 1989 manifesto, “Stalking the ...

St. Nicholas (detail) by Piero di Cosimo

Jolly Old St. Nick

His generosity and wonderworking were fabled in Christendom.

BY DAWN EDEN

Legends surrounding the life of Nicholas of Myra rank among the most ...

a civil war era submarine

The Civil War at Sea

How the Navy came of age in the War Between the States.

BY JOSEPH F. CALLO

The names of the epic Civil War land battles—Bull Run, Shiloh, ...

Stefan Zweig, Joseph Roth, 1936

Exiled in Europe

Joseph Roth’s real home was the German language.

BY MARK FALCOFF

Some literary historian of the ...

‘I’d like to buy the world a Coke.’ (1971)

Kings of the Jingle

How music and commerce combine to make America.

BY TED GIOIA

Could Mozart write jingles? “Are you kidding,” responds the ad copy for a 1990s music marketing ...

Indestructible Dream

Exploring the human instinct to live after death.

BY PETER LOPATIN

H.L. Mencken was, perhaps, not wide of the mark in defining immortality as “the condition of a dead man who doesn’t believe he is dead.” Mencken’s quip points—if only ...

Donald E. Westlake in Paris, 2004

Westlake Lives!

Two posthumous gifts from a master entertainer.

BY JON L. BREEN

When Donald E. Westlake died on New Year’s Eve 2008 at the age of 75, he was mourned as an expert and notably prolific writer of crime fiction under multiple bylines, and also as a comic novelist whose stature (in a different milieu) ...

Stephen A. Douglas

Douglas of the West

He was not called ‘the Little Giant’ for nothing.

BY EDWARD ACHORN

His contemporaries called him “the Little Giant.” They recognized that although Stephen A. Douglas was physically a pipsqueak—standing only 5-foot-4, small even for his generation—he loomed over ...

Engaged in Recitation

Reason for Rhyme

The lost art of memorizing (and reciting) verse.

BY WILLIAM H. PRITCHARD

Up rose old Barbara Frietchie then, 

CASUAL

Heap Big Irony

Philip Terzian salutes a conservative Indian

BY PHILIP TERZIAN

Charles Curtis

I have what might be called a philosophical attitude toward the defeat of Senator Scott Brown of Massachusetts. Brown, it seems to me, played his part in history by delivering “Teddy Kennedy’s seat” (in the immortal phrase of David Gergen) to the Republicans for three years—a brief but pleasant rebuke to the Kennedy myth, and a shock to the Massachusetts vision of the universe. 

But of course, with the election of Elizabeth Warren to the Senate, things are once again back to normal in the Commonwealth. What interests me about Warren, however, is not so much her politics as her status as the first Native-American woman in the Senate. Here again, I choose a postmodern point of view. I ...

SCRAPBOOK

Hostess with the Mostest

Twinkie

The Scrapbook admits it has not paid too much attention to Twinkies in recent years. Our taste in—what shall we call them?—recreational foodstuffs tends to run in other directions; and to be honest, we were never all that enamored of Twinkies in the first place. 

On the other hand, Twinkies have suffered something of a bad rap. Yes, they’re full of sugar and not especially nutritious; but they are made and marketed as a snack, not a balanced meal. And then there’s the “Twinkie defense.” Three decades ago the man who assassinated San Francisco mayor George Moscone and supervisor Harvey Milk explained his actions at trial by claiming that his judgment had been clouded by deep ...

Factcheck

Laurels and Hardy

Against its better judgment, The Scrapbook recently found itself combing through the online archives of the Columbia Journalism Review. CJR has a feature ...

Toilet House

Flush with Success?

Anybody who’s ever used a bathroom in Japan, where the commodes have more flashing buttons than the space shuttle, knows ...

Correction

In his piece on the changing of the guard at the Washington Post last week (“Declining Kingdom, Waning Power”), Philip Terzian wrote, “If this .  .  . vacancy had ...

Jerry Brown leads them to the promised land...

PARODY

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