EDITORIAL

The ‘Science’ of Same-Sex Marriage

BY ANDREW FERGUSON, FOR THE EDITORS

Our robed masters

Oral arguments on gay marriage take place before the Supreme Court the last week of March, and the pile of amicus briefs filed by interested parties long ago passed the point of redundancy. We prefer briefs filed by disinterested parties, such as the one put before the Court earlier in the month by Leon Kass of the University of Chicago and Harvey Mansfield of Harvard University. The Kass-Mansfield brief is silent on the larger question of gay marriage as social policy. The professors instead confine ...

Elephant

Grand Old Opportunity

BY YUVAL LEVIN

As they seek to revive their political fortunes in the wake of last year’s disastrous ...

Obama and BiBi

‘We Stand Together’

BY BARACK OBAMA

Today,  the sons of Abraham and the daughters of Sarah are fulfilling the dream of the ...

ARTICLES

Obamacare Isn’t Forever

This is not the second coming of Medicare.

BY JAY COST

Senator Mitch McConnell (R-Ky) stands next to a printed stack  of Obamacare’s

With the Supreme Court decision upholding President Obama’s health care law last summer and his reelection in November, liberals are triumphant, convinced that Obamacare is here to stay. When pressed on this matter, they point to the political success of Medicare to show how quickly new entitlements become entrenched.

But the politics of Obamacare, and Medicare for that matter, are much more complicated than some would have us believe. In fact, a careful analysis of both demonstrates that there are important differences, which ultimately will make Obamacareconsiderably more susceptible to ...

Ah, the good old days

The Lost Era of Economic Growth

Republicans have neglected their best issue.

BY FRED BARNES

President Obama highlighted the need for strong economic growth in his State of the Union ...

USS Harry S. Truman on a training mission in December 2012

Sea-questration

The dismantling of the Navy.

BY SETH CROPSEY

When they agreed to President Obama’s 2011 budget proposal that is responsible for the current ...

Edward Lansdale in 1963

A Better Afghanistan

Will require a better president.

BY MAX BOOT

Juan E. Méndez

Defining Torture Down

Every policy the left dislikes becomes a crime against humanity.

BY WESLEY J. SMITH

FEATURES

Tea Party Insider

Rep. Steve Southerland and the GOP class of 2010 make peace with the House leadership, and vice versa

BY JONATHAN STRONG

With fellow freshmen outside the White House, July 2011

"To go to the grocery store and get a gallon of milk takes me two or three hours,” said Rep. Steve Southerland, and you definitely believe him. Southerland isn’t the world’s slowest shopper. His grocery stops are constantly interrupted by people he knows through the family business, a network of funeral homes in the panhandle of Florida.

Undertaker is not on most “best jobs” lists, but Southerland actually misses his work back home. His grandparents lived at the funeral home, and as a kid he stayed there Friday nights. When he was growing up, everybody around town would spontaneously hug his ...

A loud reminder in Dublin, July 2011

Irish Stew

Where abortion and national identity collide

BY CHRISTOPHER CALDWELL

Dublin
Wide-eyed, heavily lipsticked, with a delicate jeweled bindi between her eyebrows and an almost joyous expression on her face, Savita Halappanavar has been staring out from the front pages of Irish newspapers, week after week, for almost half a year now. The 31-year-old ...

Books & Arts

The American Story

How does it get told outside America?

BY ALONZO L. HAMBY

First consignment of sugar to Britain under the Marshall Plan, 1949

In academia, scholars trying to get ahead look for the Next Big Thing. In the field of American foreign relations, that just may be something called “public diplomacy,” a term that conjures a vision of diplomatic efforts aimed not simply at other diplomats but at large populations. Justin Hart, associate professor of history at Texas Tech, does not give us a sharp definition of the term, but believes he knows it when he sees it.  

He finds its specific origins in Franklin D. Roosevelt’s outreach to Latin America in the 1930s, its enabling methods in the flowering of mass communications during the second and third quarters of the 20th century, and its utilization during and after World War II in the pursuit of ...

Alexandra Aldrich

House of Cards

In the eyes of a child, the collapse of a family.

BY WENDY BURDEN

"The Declaration of Independence was signed by, among others, our ancestor Robert Livingston,” 10-year-old Alexandra lectures her

'Tourists II' by Duane Hanson (1988)

Getting There

How, and why, Americans go on vacation.

BY THOMAS SWICK

Every March I drive to Miami Beach to attend the annual Cruise Shipping conference and trade show, and every year I ...

‘The Duke of Marlborough at the Battle of Oudenaarde’ (ca. 1740) by John Wootton

Empire of Liberty

How the New World was made by an illustrious Churchill.

BY THOMAS DONNELLY

At 8:00 a.m. on July 11, 1708, John ...

Spring Breakers

Trip to Nowhere

‘The dark heart of shiftless American youth’ just got darker.

BY JOHN PODHORETZ

I won’t say Spring Breakers is the worst movie ever made, because ...

CASUAL

A Voice, Not an Echo

Philip Terzian on our speech impediment

BY PHILIP TERZIAN

Famous Folks

Switching through the dozens of cable TV channels we seem to receive at home, I was reminded of a disheartening thought I’ve had in the past: There must be thousands upon thousands of hours of sound and video of, say, Justin Bieber or Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), but no photograph exists of Ben Jonson or Benjamin Franklin, and no one has any idea what Geoffrey Chaucer or Joan of Arc or Saint Augustine or Stonewall Jackson sounded like. The technology that assails us with the sights and sounds of Madonna, or Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, doesn’t exist for those we would truly value hearing and seeing. Or I would like to hear and see, at any rate. 

SCRAPBOOK

Razing Reagan

Reagan's Chicago Home

Absent a miracle, Ronald Reagan’s childhood home in Chicago will be slated for demolition this week to make way for a new facility owned by the University of Chicago. It’s a sad and unnecessary end to a historic residence of a president born and bred in the state.

Those who would preserve the place have tried just about everything. But the small-minded Commission on Chicago Landmarks has refused to give the small apartment building on 57th Street landmark status. It’s not “associated with Mr. Reagan during his active and productive years,” and the building “does not have sufficient ...

Little Red Book

How Now Chairman Mao?

The Scrapbook doesn’t spend a lot of its time surfing tired bureaucratic websites that look like relics of the 1990s, ...

Kate Upton

The Dating Game

To the list of perennial press stories—the schoolgirl who refuses to pledge allegiance to the flag but is off to Harvard this fall, the old Vermont farmer who voted for ...

St. John's Abbey

Regulations that Deserve a Burial

Fifteen months ago, The Scrapbook cheered on the monks of Saint Joseph Abbey, in Covington, ...

Sequestration

PARODY

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