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Leader of Bermuda Opposition Explains "No Confidence" Motion

3:24 PM, Jun 12, 2009 • By JOHN MCCORMACK
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As reported earlier on this blog, members of the minority United Bermuda Party have formally introduced a "no confidence" motion to remove Premier Ewart Brown from power because of his unilateral decision to accept four Uighur detainees from Gitmo.

In Bermuda's Westminster-style parliament, Brown's ruling Progressive Labour Party has 22 out of 36 seats; the United Bermuda Party has 13, and one MP is an independent. In an official statement, United Bermuda Party Leader Kim Swan explains: "we are seeking with this motion is a change of leadership for Bermuda - not necessarily a change of government at this time - but a change that can get this island back on a steady course."

Bermuda last held parliamentary elections, which gave a 5-year mandate to the PLP government, in 2007. The current government may call for new elections any time between now and 2012.

You can find Swan's full statement after the jump.

Motion of no confidence

By Kim Swan, JP, MP, United Bermuda Party Leader

Why have we moved a motion of no confidence?

The public affairs of Bermuda are increasingly subject to the politics of one man rule under the Premier, Dr. Ewart Brown. We consider this unhealthy and not in Bermuda's best interest.

This is not just about Uighars in Bermuda, though that issue typifies a style of leadership that is reckless, autocratic and conducted with no sense of accountability to the people or, indeed, to Bermuda's Constitution.

The motion reflects concerns held by the general public but also our long-standing concerns about a host of public issues that have not been well managed.

What we are seeking with this motion is a change of leadership for Bermuda - not necessarily a change of government at this time - but a change that can get this island back on a steady course, where we no longer are distracted by the antics of one man, where we can collectively get together, roll up our sleeves and start working on solutions that are best for Bermuda.

The motion was drafted with reference to Section 59 of the Bermuda Constitution: "Tenure of Office of the Premier and other Ministers."