The Blog

Former Clinton Aide Will Be Biden's Chief of Staff

2:38 PM, Jan 14, 2011 • By MICHAEL WARREN
Widget tooltip
Single Page Print Larger Text Smaller Text Alerts

The Hill reports that Vice President Joe Biden has named Bruce Reed his new chief of staff:

Reed, a former Clinton aide and the longtime head of the centrist Democratic Leadership Council (DLC), is the latest in a long line of former Clinton aides to join the Obama administration in recent weeks.

Reed replaces Ron Klain, who announced his return to the private sector earlier this month.

Reed has been working in the Obama administration, most recently as executive director of the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform, also known as the Bowles-Simpson Commission....

Reed served in the Clinton White House for four years as chief domestic policy adviser, helping shape some of Clinton's most notable and centrist legislative achievements.

And in yesterday's Wall Street Journal, Karl Rove analyzed Obama's new chief of staff, former Clinton commerce secretary Bill Daley:

Mr. Daley is unlikely to constantly outsource the drafting of legislation to Congress. He'll also end the West Wing's habit of only talking to Democrats and instead speak often with senior congressional Republicans. During the president's first two years in office, GOP leaders were more objects of contempt than conversation.

Mr. Daley already has an extraordinary number of staff posts to fill and may force even more departures. If the rumor mill is correct, by spring there could be only seven people in the 23 to 25 seats at the morning senior staff meeting who were there a year ago.

Nor is the White House likely to be nearly so insular and arrogant, certain that all wisdom resides within its 18 acres. When faced with a challenge, Mr. Daley's instincts will be to draw in outsiders who possess practical experience.

Mr. Daley will probably streamline the West Wing's unwieldy decision-making structure while expanding the range of opinions the president hears. There are likely to be fewer senior aides, including perhaps an end to the (unwise) practice of the president's top people having their own individual "chiefs of staff."

Read the whole thing here.

Recent Blog Posts

The Weekly Standard Archives

Browse 15 Years of the Weekly Standard

Old covers